Short term applications of low and high temperature stresses to roots for high quality spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.)

Y. Chadirin, Akiko Nakano, H. Kagawa, Y. Sago, Kitano Masaharu

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Low temperature stress to roots causes a depression in root water absorption, and the resulting water deficit can induce the plant adaptive functions such as osmoregulation and antioxidation. Therefore, plant responses to the root low temperature stress can be expected to produce high quality vegetables with the higher concentrations of the healthful substances such as sugars and antioxidants and with the lower concentrations of the harmful substances such as NO3 - and oxalic acid. Two weeks treatment with the root low temperature stress of 10°C produced high quality spinach with the higher concentrations of sugar, ascorbic acid and Fe, and with the lower concentrations of NO3-and oxalic acid, whereas the longer stress treatment resulted in extremely depressed plant growth. Therefore the short term application of the low temperature stress combined with the short term pre-treatment with the high temperature of 30°C was examined, when the high temperature pre-treatment enhanced favorable effects of the short term low temperature stress. During ten days before the harvest, the high temperature pre-treatment of 30°C was applied for one day or three days, and following the high temperature pre-treatment, the low temperature stress of 10°C was applied for four days or seven days. The three days high temperature pretreatment followed by the seven days low temperature stress brought the highest quality with a slight depression in growth. This suggests that the short-term application of the low temperature stress to roots after the short-term high temperature pretreatment is applicable for value-added leafy vegetables.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationXXVIII International Horticultural Congress on Science and Horticulture for People (IHC2010)
Subtitle of host publicationInternational Symposium on Plant Physiology from Cell to Fruit Production System
PublisherInternational Society for Horticultural Science
Pages351-358
Number of pages8
ISBN (Print)9789066051188
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 1 2012

Publication series

NameActa Horticulturae
Volume932
ISSN (Print)0567-7572

Fingerprint

Spinacia oleracea
spinach
temperature
pretreatment
oxalic acid
sugars
green leafy vegetables
osmoregulation
value added
water uptake
plant response

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Horticulture

Cite this

Chadirin, Y., Nakano, A., Kagawa, H., Sago, Y., & Masaharu, K. (2012). Short term applications of low and high temperature stresses to roots for high quality spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.). In XXVIII International Horticultural Congress on Science and Horticulture for People (IHC2010): International Symposium on Plant Physiology from Cell to Fruit Production System (pp. 351-358). (Acta Horticulturae; Vol. 932). International Society for Horticultural Science. https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.2012.932.51

Short term applications of low and high temperature stresses to roots for high quality spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.). / Chadirin, Y.; Nakano, Akiko; Kagawa, H.; Sago, Y.; Masaharu, Kitano.

XXVIII International Horticultural Congress on Science and Horticulture for People (IHC2010): International Symposium on Plant Physiology from Cell to Fruit Production System. International Society for Horticultural Science, 2012. p. 351-358 (Acta Horticulturae; Vol. 932).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Chadirin, Y, Nakano, A, Kagawa, H, Sago, Y & Masaharu, K 2012, Short term applications of low and high temperature stresses to roots for high quality spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.). in XXVIII International Horticultural Congress on Science and Horticulture for People (IHC2010): International Symposium on Plant Physiology from Cell to Fruit Production System. Acta Horticulturae, vol. 932, International Society for Horticultural Science, pp. 351-358. https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.2012.932.51
Chadirin Y, Nakano A, Kagawa H, Sago Y, Masaharu K. Short term applications of low and high temperature stresses to roots for high quality spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.). In XXVIII International Horticultural Congress on Science and Horticulture for People (IHC2010): International Symposium on Plant Physiology from Cell to Fruit Production System. International Society for Horticultural Science. 2012. p. 351-358. (Acta Horticulturae). https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.2012.932.51
Chadirin, Y. ; Nakano, Akiko ; Kagawa, H. ; Sago, Y. ; Masaharu, Kitano. / Short term applications of low and high temperature stresses to roots for high quality spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.). XXVIII International Horticultural Congress on Science and Horticulture for People (IHC2010): International Symposium on Plant Physiology from Cell to Fruit Production System. International Society for Horticultural Science, 2012. pp. 351-358 (Acta Horticulturae).
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