Short-term dynamics of cyanobacterial toxins (microcystins) following a discharge from a coastal reservoir in Isahaya Bay, Japan

Akira Umehara, Tomohiro Komorita, Akira Tai, Tohru Takahashi, Ryo Orita, Hiroaki Tsutsumi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Freshwater cyanobacteria produce highly toxic substances such as microcystins (MCs), and water containing MCs is often discharged to downstream and coastal areas. We conducted field monitoring in Isahaya Bay to clarify the short-term dynamics of MCs discharged from a reservoir following a cyanobacteria bloom in the warm season. MCs were detected in the seawater of the bay (max. 0.10μgL-1), and were deposited on the sea floor, with the MC content of the surface sediment increasing by approximately five times (0.11±0.077-0.53±0.15μgkgww-1, mean±SD) at the four stations near the reservoir drainage gate before and after the discharge. The MCs was then transported from the mouth of the bay by tidal currents during the period of the study. Therefore, the MCs were moved away from the closed water area where the cyanobacteria blooms, and spread throughout the coastal area.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)73-79
Number of pages7
JournalMarine Pollution Bulletin
Volume92
Issue number1-2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 15 2015

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oceanography
  • Aquatic Science
  • Pollution

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