Significance of modified Glasgow prognostic score as a useful indicator for prognosis of patients with gastric carcinoma

Tadahiro Nozoe, Tomohiro Iguchi, Akinori Egashira, Eisuke Adachi, Akito Matsukuma, Takahiro Ezaki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Background: The significance of the Glasgow prognostic score (GPS), an inflammation-based prognostic score, as an indicator of aggressiveness in gastric carcinoma has not been investigated fully. Methods: Two hundred thirty-two patients with gastric carcinoma were enrolled. Patients who had both an elevated C-reactive protein (>1.0 mg/dL) and hypoalbuminemia (<3.5 g/dL) were allocated a traditional GPS (TGPS) of 2. Patients who had one of these abnormal values were allocated a TGPS of 1, and patients who had neither were allocated a TGPS of 0. Results: There existed a significant difference between the survival of adjacent groups of patients when examined using the TGPS (P = .05 for TGPS 0 vs 1 and P = .006 for TGPS 1 vs 2). Multivariate analysis based on TGPS demonstrated that TGPS (P = .020) and tumor stage (P = .0007) proved to be independent prognostic indicators for worse prognosis. Conclusions: The preoperative measurement of an inflammation-based prognostic score can demonstrate a strict stratification for the prognosis of patients with gastric carcinoma.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)186-191
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Surgery
Volume201
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 1 2011

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Stomach
Carcinoma
Inflammation
Hypoalbuminemia
C-Reactive Protein
Multivariate Analysis
Survival
Neoplasms

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery

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Significance of modified Glasgow prognostic score as a useful indicator for prognosis of patients with gastric carcinoma. / Nozoe, Tadahiro; Iguchi, Tomohiro; Egashira, Akinori; Adachi, Eisuke; Matsukuma, Akito; Ezaki, Takahiro.

In: American Journal of Surgery, Vol. 201, No. 2, 01.02.2011, p. 186-191.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nozoe, Tadahiro ; Iguchi, Tomohiro ; Egashira, Akinori ; Adachi, Eisuke ; Matsukuma, Akito ; Ezaki, Takahiro. / Significance of modified Glasgow prognostic score as a useful indicator for prognosis of patients with gastric carcinoma. In: American Journal of Surgery. 2011 ; Vol. 201, No. 2. pp. 186-191.
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