Silent myocardial ischemia in patients with variant angina

Kensuke Egashira, Haruo Araki, Akira Takeshita, Motoomi Nakamura

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Twenty-four hour ambulatory electrocardiographic recording was performed in 56 patients with variant angina admitted to the coronary care unit in order to evaluate the incidence and pathophysiology of silent episodes of ST elevation. Of 696 episodes of ST elevation of more than 0.1 mV identified during a recording period of 141 days, 531 (76%) episodes were completely silent. The incidence of silent episodes increased as the number of total ischemic episodes per day increased. Silent ST elevation revealed a significantly shorter duration and a lower intensity than symptomatic ST elevation. However, there were wide overlaps in the duration and intensity of ST elevation between silent and symptomatic episodes. In some patients, silent and symptomatic episodes of similar duration and intensity were observed. Arrhythmias during ischemic episodes such as premature ventricular contractions, ventricular tachycardia, high grade atrioventricular block, and sinus arrest were observed in 32 of 56 patients, 57% of cases and 9% of the total episodes. Arrhythmias were more common during symptomatic episodes (29%) than during silent ones (9%, p<0.01), but serious arrhythmias such as ventricular tachycardia, high grade atrioventricular block and sinus arrest occurred even during silent episodes. In both silent and symptomatic episodes, the duration and intensity of ST elevation were significantly lower in ischemic episodes with arrhythmias than in those without arrhythmias. These results suggest that 1) the majority of ischemic events are silent in patients with variant angina; 2) the severity of ischemia seems to be an important factor as the cause of anginal pain, but additional factors may be involved; 3) arrhythmias were more common during symptomatic than silent episodes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1452-1457
Number of pages6
JournalJAPANESE CIRCULATION JOURNAL
Volume53
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 1989

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Myocardial Ischemia
Cardiac Arrhythmias
Atrioventricular Block
Ventricular Tachycardia
Coronary Care Units
Ventricular Premature Complexes
Incidence
Ischemia
Pain

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physiology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Silent myocardial ischemia in patients with variant angina. / Egashira, Kensuke; Araki, Haruo; Takeshita, Akira; Nakamura, Motoomi.

In: JAPANESE CIRCULATION JOURNAL, Vol. 53, No. 11, 01.01.1989, p. 1452-1457.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Egashira, Kensuke ; Araki, Haruo ; Takeshita, Akira ; Nakamura, Motoomi. / Silent myocardial ischemia in patients with variant angina. In: JAPANESE CIRCULATION JOURNAL. 1989 ; Vol. 53, No. 11. pp. 1452-1457.
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