Sketching Layers in Japan: Mineral Wealth, Geo-bodies and Imperial Territory

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

In 1876, an American by the name of Benjamin Smith Lyman submitted to the Japanese government a geological map of ‘Yesso’, which had been compiled under his direction. This map displayed the assumed stratigraphy of Hokkaido, in northern Japan, and is considered the first modern geological map to be produced by an Asian state. This provided a new means of comprehending territory, at exactly the moment the land in question was being re-presented as Hokkaido. The strata exhumed in the course of mapping this land at depth were not limited to those under the Earth. The map was assembled atop a history of Japanese control over the region, one which accounted for the precocious presence of an earlier American survey, conducted under the previous Tokugawa government, which had sought to map mineral deposits in this land of Yesso. These in turn reflected a longer history of mineral extraction, present in the earliest accounts of Ezo, and the motivation for Japan to have long ‘held the reins’ over this amorphous region. The 1876 geological map is a striking example of colonial modernity, through which we are able to observe the institutional mimicry characteristic to, and increasingly emphasized in the study of, late-nineteenth century inter-imperial society. The presence of this map challenges us to recover the various strata atop of which this imperial sociability was able to flourish, and examine the role of the map in incorporating a modernizing Japan within a globally-comprehensible means of territorial authority and control.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationMapping Empires
Subtitle of host publicationColonial Cartographies of Land and Sea - 7th International Symposium of the ICA Commission on the History of Cartography, 2018
EditorsAlexander James Kent, Soetkin Vervust, Imre Josef Demhardt, Nick Millea
PublisherSpringer Berlin Heidelberg
Pages3-22
Number of pages20
ISBN (Print)9783030234461
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2020
Event7th International Symposium of the ICA Commission on the History of Cartography, 2018 - Oxford, United Kingdom
Duration: Sep 13 2018Sep 15 2018

Publication series

NameLecture Notes in Geoinformation and Cartography
ISSN (Print)1863-2246
ISSN (Electronic)1863-2351

Conference

Conference7th International Symposium of the ICA Commission on the History of Cartography, 2018
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityOxford
Period9/13/189/15/18

Fingerprint

Stratigraphy
Mineral resources
mineral resource
stratigraphy
Minerals
Japan
social stratum
mineral
sociability
history
Switzerland
modernity
nineteenth century
mimicry
mineral deposit
Earth (planet)

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Earth-Surface Processes
  • Computers in Earth Sciences

Cite this

Boyle, E. (2020). Sketching Layers in Japan: Mineral Wealth, Geo-bodies and Imperial Territory. In A. J. Kent, S. Vervust, I. J. Demhardt, & N. Millea (Eds.), Mapping Empires: Colonial Cartographies of Land and Sea - 7th International Symposium of the ICA Commission on the History of Cartography, 2018 (pp. 3-22). (Lecture Notes in Geoinformation and Cartography). Springer Berlin Heidelberg. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-23447-8_1

Sketching Layers in Japan : Mineral Wealth, Geo-bodies and Imperial Territory. / Boyle, Edward.

Mapping Empires: Colonial Cartographies of Land and Sea - 7th International Symposium of the ICA Commission on the History of Cartography, 2018. ed. / Alexander James Kent; Soetkin Vervust; Imre Josef Demhardt; Nick Millea. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2020. p. 3-22 (Lecture Notes in Geoinformation and Cartography).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Boyle, E 2020, Sketching Layers in Japan: Mineral Wealth, Geo-bodies and Imperial Territory. in AJ Kent, S Vervust, IJ Demhardt & N Millea (eds), Mapping Empires: Colonial Cartographies of Land and Sea - 7th International Symposium of the ICA Commission on the History of Cartography, 2018. Lecture Notes in Geoinformation and Cartography, Springer Berlin Heidelberg, pp. 3-22, 7th International Symposium of the ICA Commission on the History of Cartography, 2018, Oxford, United Kingdom, 9/13/18. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-23447-8_1
Boyle E. Sketching Layers in Japan: Mineral Wealth, Geo-bodies and Imperial Territory. In Kent AJ, Vervust S, Demhardt IJ, Millea N, editors, Mapping Empires: Colonial Cartographies of Land and Sea - 7th International Symposium of the ICA Commission on the History of Cartography, 2018. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. 2020. p. 3-22. (Lecture Notes in Geoinformation and Cartography). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-23447-8_1
Boyle, Edward. / Sketching Layers in Japan : Mineral Wealth, Geo-bodies and Imperial Territory. Mapping Empires: Colonial Cartographies of Land and Sea - 7th International Symposium of the ICA Commission on the History of Cartography, 2018. editor / Alexander James Kent ; Soetkin Vervust ; Imre Josef Demhardt ; Nick Millea. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2020. pp. 3-22 (Lecture Notes in Geoinformation and Cartography).
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