Source analysis of spontaneous MEG activities in human subjects during sleep

Shoogo Ueno, Keiji Iramina

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

This study focuses on neuromagnetic approaches to the detection of the brain electrical activities which are difficult to detect by EEG measurements. Sources of the delta waves in human subjects during sleep were investigated in the time and frequency domains. Both EEG and MEG activities were recorded simultaneously. The components of magnetic fields perpendicular to the surface of the head were measured using a SQUID. We observed that the frequency distributions were different for delta waves measured by MEG and EEG recordings. This frequency shift suggests that the sources which generate the magnetic fields are different from those which produce the EEG.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS 1992
EditorsJean Louis Coatrieux, Robert Plonsey, Swamy Laxminarayan, Jean Pierre Morucci
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
Pages2655-2656
Number of pages2
ISBN (Electronic)0780307852
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 1992
Event14th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS 1992 - Paris, France
Duration: Oct 29 1992Nov 1 1992

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS
Volume6
ISSN (Print)1557-170X

Conference

Conference14th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS 1992
CountryFrance
CityParis
Period10/29/9211/1/92

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Signal Processing
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
  • Health Informatics

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