Source-specific social support and circulating inflammatory markers among white-collar employees

Akinori Nakata, Masahiro Irie, Masaya Takahashi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Despite known beneficial effects of social support on cardiovascular health, the pathway through which sources of support (supervisor, coworkers, family/friends) influence inflammatory markers is not completely understood. Purpose We investigated the independent and moderating associations between social support and inflammatory markers. Methods A total of 137 male white-collar employees underwent a blood draw for measurement of high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), monocyte and leukocyte counts, and completed a questionnaire on social support. Results Multivariable linear regression analyses controlling for covariates revealed that supervisor support was inversely associated with IL-6 (β =-0.24, p <0.01) while coworker support was marginally associated with TNF-α (β =-0.16, p <0.10). Support from family/friends was not associated with inflammatory markers. Conclusion Social support from the immediate supervisor may be a potential mechanism through which social support exerts beneficial effects on inflammatory markers in working men.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)335-346
Number of pages12
JournalAnnals of Behavioral Medicine
Volume47
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2014

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Social Support
Interleukin-6
Leukocyte Count
C-Reactive Protein
Monocytes
Linear Models
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
Regression Analysis
Health

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychology(all)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Source-specific social support and circulating inflammatory markers among white-collar employees. / Nakata, Akinori; Irie, Masahiro; Takahashi, Masaya.

In: Annals of Behavioral Medicine, Vol. 47, No. 3, 01.01.2014, p. 335-346.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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