Spatial and temporal seismic velocity changes on Kyushu Island during the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Monitoring of earthquake faults and volcanoes contributes to our understanding of their dynamic mechanisms and to our ability to predict future earthquakes and volcanic activity. We report here on spatial and temporal variations of seismic velocity around the seismogenic fault of the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake [moment magnitude (Mw) 7.0] based on ambient seismic noise. Seismic velocity near the rupture faults and Aso volcano decreased during the earthquake. The velocity reduction near the faultsmay have been due to formation damage, a change in stress state, and an increase in pore pressure. Further, wemapped the post-earthquake fault-healing process. The largest seismic velocity reduction observed at Aso volcano during the earthquake was likely caused by pressurized volcanic fluids, and the large increase in seismic velocity at the volcano's magma body observed ∼3 months after the earthquake may have been a response to depressurization caused by the eruption. This study demonstrates the usefulness of continuous monitoring of faults and volcanoes.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere1700813
JournalScience Advances
Volume3
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 1 2017

Fingerprint

seismic velocity
earthquake
volcano
seismic noise
monitoring
pore pressure
rupture
temporal variation
spatial variation
volcanic eruption
magma
damage
fluid

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General

Cite this

Spatial and temporal seismic velocity changes on Kyushu Island during the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake. / Nimiya, Hiro; Ikeda, Tatsunori; Tsuji, Takeshi.

In: Science Advances, Vol. 3, No. 11, e1700813, 01.11.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{1e224c11f69a4e96a1491dcd0d2ae6d2,
title = "Spatial and temporal seismic velocity changes on Kyushu Island during the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake",
abstract = "Monitoring of earthquake faults and volcanoes contributes to our understanding of their dynamic mechanisms and to our ability to predict future earthquakes and volcanic activity. We report here on spatial and temporal variations of seismic velocity around the seismogenic fault of the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake [moment magnitude (Mw) 7.0] based on ambient seismic noise. Seismic velocity near the rupture faults and Aso volcano decreased during the earthquake. The velocity reduction near the faultsmay have been due to formation damage, a change in stress state, and an increase in pore pressure. Further, wemapped the post-earthquake fault-healing process. The largest seismic velocity reduction observed at Aso volcano during the earthquake was likely caused by pressurized volcanic fluids, and the large increase in seismic velocity at the volcano's magma body observed ∼3 months after the earthquake may have been a response to depressurization caused by the eruption. This study demonstrates the usefulness of continuous monitoring of faults and volcanoes.",
author = "Hiro Nimiya and Tatsunori Ikeda and Takeshi Tsuji",
year = "2017",
month = "11",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1126/sciadv.1700813",
language = "English",
volume = "3",
journal = "Science advances",
issn = "2375-2548",
publisher = "American Association for the Advancement of Science",
number = "11",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Spatial and temporal seismic velocity changes on Kyushu Island during the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake

AU - Nimiya, Hiro

AU - Ikeda, Tatsunori

AU - Tsuji, Takeshi

PY - 2017/11/1

Y1 - 2017/11/1

N2 - Monitoring of earthquake faults and volcanoes contributes to our understanding of their dynamic mechanisms and to our ability to predict future earthquakes and volcanic activity. We report here on spatial and temporal variations of seismic velocity around the seismogenic fault of the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake [moment magnitude (Mw) 7.0] based on ambient seismic noise. Seismic velocity near the rupture faults and Aso volcano decreased during the earthquake. The velocity reduction near the faultsmay have been due to formation damage, a change in stress state, and an increase in pore pressure. Further, wemapped the post-earthquake fault-healing process. The largest seismic velocity reduction observed at Aso volcano during the earthquake was likely caused by pressurized volcanic fluids, and the large increase in seismic velocity at the volcano's magma body observed ∼3 months after the earthquake may have been a response to depressurization caused by the eruption. This study demonstrates the usefulness of continuous monitoring of faults and volcanoes.

AB - Monitoring of earthquake faults and volcanoes contributes to our understanding of their dynamic mechanisms and to our ability to predict future earthquakes and volcanic activity. We report here on spatial and temporal variations of seismic velocity around the seismogenic fault of the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake [moment magnitude (Mw) 7.0] based on ambient seismic noise. Seismic velocity near the rupture faults and Aso volcano decreased during the earthquake. The velocity reduction near the faultsmay have been due to formation damage, a change in stress state, and an increase in pore pressure. Further, wemapped the post-earthquake fault-healing process. The largest seismic velocity reduction observed at Aso volcano during the earthquake was likely caused by pressurized volcanic fluids, and the large increase in seismic velocity at the volcano's magma body observed ∼3 months after the earthquake may have been a response to depressurization caused by the eruption. This study demonstrates the usefulness of continuous monitoring of faults and volcanoes.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85041731896&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85041731896&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1126/sciadv.1700813

DO - 10.1126/sciadv.1700813

M3 - Article

VL - 3

JO - Science advances

JF - Science advances

SN - 2375-2548

IS - 11

M1 - e1700813

ER -