Species Composition, Diversity and Productivity of Homesteads in Southeastern Bangladesh

Md Abiar Rahman, Masakazu Tani, Kazuo Asahiro, S. M. Asik Ullah

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A homestead is an integrated production system where trees, crops, livestock and poultry are found in and around the household residence in Bangladesh. It is a potential production unit that provides various product, service and ecological functions. Almost all people in Bangladesh including landless households have homesteads in which they grow trees and crops even in a small piece of land. This study characterizes the species composition, diversity and productivity of the homestead production system in the Teknaf peninsula, southeastern Bangladesh. Survey data collection was from a total of 180 homesteads covering five household categories: large, medium, small, marginal and landless. Vegetable, fruit, timber, and livestock and poultry were common components in the homestead production system. Various types of plants were mainly concentrated in back yards, front yards, boundaries and corners of homesteads. The mean number of tree species per homestead was about 15. In total, 189 tree and shrub species were recorded, and were distinctly high and low in the large (363.7) and landless (55.7) household categories. Species composition, diversity and productivity of homesteads were found to be related to household categories. Richness and diversity of tree and shrub species increased with household size. Betel nut was the dominant tree species followed by mango, jackfruit and coconut. Annual income from homesteads also varied among the household categories, with a mean contribution of the homestead to annual income of about 25 %. A large portion of homestead income came from betel nut trees. There is scope to increase species diversity and income by designing homesteads with the engagement of women and other family members.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)295-309
Number of pages15
JournalSmall-scale Forestry
Volume16
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 1 2017

Fingerprint

Bangladesh
households
species diversity
productivity
income
production system
nut
poultry
livestock
production technology
shrub
shrubs
nut trees
jackfruits
integrated agricultural systems
crop
ecological function
coconuts
crops
household

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Forestry

Cite this

Species Composition, Diversity and Productivity of Homesteads in Southeastern Bangladesh. / Rahman, Md Abiar; Tani, Masakazu; Asahiro, Kazuo; Asik Ullah, S. M.

In: Small-scale Forestry, Vol. 16, No. 3, 01.09.2017, p. 295-309.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{a9dc1e5f7d9d49e19890e55b31f0e712,
title = "Species Composition, Diversity and Productivity of Homesteads in Southeastern Bangladesh",
abstract = "A homestead is an integrated production system where trees, crops, livestock and poultry are found in and around the household residence in Bangladesh. It is a potential production unit that provides various product, service and ecological functions. Almost all people in Bangladesh including landless households have homesteads in which they grow trees and crops even in a small piece of land. This study characterizes the species composition, diversity and productivity of the homestead production system in the Teknaf peninsula, southeastern Bangladesh. Survey data collection was from a total of 180 homesteads covering five household categories: large, medium, small, marginal and landless. Vegetable, fruit, timber, and livestock and poultry were common components in the homestead production system. Various types of plants were mainly concentrated in back yards, front yards, boundaries and corners of homesteads. The mean number of tree species per homestead was about 15. In total, 189 tree and shrub species were recorded, and were distinctly high and low in the large (363.7) and landless (55.7) household categories. Species composition, diversity and productivity of homesteads were found to be related to household categories. Richness and diversity of tree and shrub species increased with household size. Betel nut was the dominant tree species followed by mango, jackfruit and coconut. Annual income from homesteads also varied among the household categories, with a mean contribution of the homestead to annual income of about 25 {\%}. A large portion of homestead income came from betel nut trees. There is scope to increase species diversity and income by designing homesteads with the engagement of women and other family members.",
author = "Rahman, {Md Abiar} and Masakazu Tani and Kazuo Asahiro and {Asik Ullah}, {S. M.}",
year = "2017",
month = "9",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s11842-016-9356-8",
language = "English",
volume = "16",
pages = "295--309",
journal = "Small-scale Forestry",
issn = "1873-7617",
publisher = "Springer Netherlands",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Species Composition, Diversity and Productivity of Homesteads in Southeastern Bangladesh

AU - Rahman, Md Abiar

AU - Tani, Masakazu

AU - Asahiro, Kazuo

AU - Asik Ullah, S. M.

PY - 2017/9/1

Y1 - 2017/9/1

N2 - A homestead is an integrated production system where trees, crops, livestock and poultry are found in and around the household residence in Bangladesh. It is a potential production unit that provides various product, service and ecological functions. Almost all people in Bangladesh including landless households have homesteads in which they grow trees and crops even in a small piece of land. This study characterizes the species composition, diversity and productivity of the homestead production system in the Teknaf peninsula, southeastern Bangladesh. Survey data collection was from a total of 180 homesteads covering five household categories: large, medium, small, marginal and landless. Vegetable, fruit, timber, and livestock and poultry were common components in the homestead production system. Various types of plants were mainly concentrated in back yards, front yards, boundaries and corners of homesteads. The mean number of tree species per homestead was about 15. In total, 189 tree and shrub species were recorded, and were distinctly high and low in the large (363.7) and landless (55.7) household categories. Species composition, diversity and productivity of homesteads were found to be related to household categories. Richness and diversity of tree and shrub species increased with household size. Betel nut was the dominant tree species followed by mango, jackfruit and coconut. Annual income from homesteads also varied among the household categories, with a mean contribution of the homestead to annual income of about 25 %. A large portion of homestead income came from betel nut trees. There is scope to increase species diversity and income by designing homesteads with the engagement of women and other family members.

AB - A homestead is an integrated production system where trees, crops, livestock and poultry are found in and around the household residence in Bangladesh. It is a potential production unit that provides various product, service and ecological functions. Almost all people in Bangladesh including landless households have homesteads in which they grow trees and crops even in a small piece of land. This study characterizes the species composition, diversity and productivity of the homestead production system in the Teknaf peninsula, southeastern Bangladesh. Survey data collection was from a total of 180 homesteads covering five household categories: large, medium, small, marginal and landless. Vegetable, fruit, timber, and livestock and poultry were common components in the homestead production system. Various types of plants were mainly concentrated in back yards, front yards, boundaries and corners of homesteads. The mean number of tree species per homestead was about 15. In total, 189 tree and shrub species were recorded, and were distinctly high and low in the large (363.7) and landless (55.7) household categories. Species composition, diversity and productivity of homesteads were found to be related to household categories. Richness and diversity of tree and shrub species increased with household size. Betel nut was the dominant tree species followed by mango, jackfruit and coconut. Annual income from homesteads also varied among the household categories, with a mean contribution of the homestead to annual income of about 25 %. A large portion of homestead income came from betel nut trees. There is scope to increase species diversity and income by designing homesteads with the engagement of women and other family members.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84991401432&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84991401432&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s11842-016-9356-8

DO - 10.1007/s11842-016-9356-8

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84991401432

VL - 16

SP - 295

EP - 309

JO - Small-scale Forestry

JF - Small-scale Forestry

SN - 1873-7617

IS - 3

ER -