Specific binding of eukaryotic ORC to DNA replication origins depends on highly conserved basic residues

Hironori Kawakami, Eiji Ohashi, Shota Kanamoto, Toshiki Tsurimoto, Tsutomu Katayama

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9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In eukaryotes, the origin recognition complex (ORC) heterohexamer preferentially binds replication origins to trigger initiation of DNA replication. Crystallographic studies using eubacterial and archaeal ORC orthologs suggested that eukaryotic ORC may bind to origin DNA via putative winged-helix DNA-binding domains and AAA+ ATPase domains. However, the mechanisms how eukaryotic ORC recognizes origin DNA remain elusive. Here, we show in budding yeast that Lys-362 and Arg-367 residues of the largest subunit (Orc1), both outside the aforementioned domains, are crucial for specific binding of ORC to origin DNA. These basic residues, which reside in a putative disordered domain, were dispensable for interaction with ATP and non-specific DNA sequences, suggesting a specific role in recognition. Consistent with this, both residues were required for origin binding of Orc1 in vivo. A truncated Orc1 polypeptide containing these residues solely recognizes ARS sequence with low affinity and Arg-367 residue stimulates sequence specific binding mode of the polypeptide. Lys-362 and Arg-367 residues of Orc1 are highly conserved among eukaryotic ORCs, but not in eubacterial and archaeal orthologs, suggesting a eukaryote-specific mechanism underlying recognition of replication origins by ORC.

Original languageEnglish
Article number14929
JournalScientific reports
Volume5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 12 2015

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Origin Recognition Complex
Replication Origin
DNA Replication
DNA
Eukaryota
Peptides
Saccharomycetales
Adenosine Triphosphatases
Adenosine Triphosphate

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General

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Specific binding of eukaryotic ORC to DNA replication origins depends on highly conserved basic residues. / Kawakami, Hironori; Ohashi, Eiji; Kanamoto, Shota; Tsurimoto, Toshiki; Katayama, Tsutomu.

In: Scientific reports, Vol. 5, 14929, 12.10.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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