Spontaneous regression of posterior epidural migrated lumbar disc fragments

Case series

Kiyoshi Tarukado, Ko Ikuta, Yoshiaki Fukutoku, Osamu Tono, Toshio Doi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background context Posterior epidural migrated lumbar disc fragments is an extremely rare disorder. Surgical treatment was performed in all reported cases. To the best of our knowledge, there are no reported cases of the use of conservative treatment for posterior epidural migrated lumbar disc fragments. Purpose To report the possibility of a spontaneous regression of posterior epidural migrated lumbar disc fragments. Study design Case series. Methods Four patients with posterior epidural migrated lumbar disc fragments were treated at Karatsu Red Cross Hospital between April 2008 and August 2010. Spontaneous regression of the posterior epidural migrated lumbar disc fragments with relief of symptoms was observed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in three cases. Another patient underwent surgical treatment. The present and previously reported cases of posterior epidural migrated lumbar disc fragments were analyzed with respect to patient age, imaging features on MRI, the level of the lesion, clinical symptoms, treatment, and outcomes. Results Conservative treatment was successful, and spontaneous lesion regression was seen on MRI with symptom relief in three cases. Conclusions Although posterior epidural migrated lumbar disc fragment cases are generally treated surgically, the condition can regress spontaneously over time, as do sequestrated disc fragments. Spontaneous regression of lumbar disc herniations is a widely accepted observation at present. Posterior epidural migrated lumbar disc fragments fall under the sequestrated type of disc herniation. In fact, the course of treatment for posterior epidural migrated lumbar disc fragments should be determined based on the symptoms and examination findings, as in cases of ordinary herniation. However, providing early surgical treatment is important if the patient has acute cauda equina syndrome or the neurologic symptoms worsen over time.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)e57-e62
JournalSpine Journal
Volume15
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1 2015

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Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Polyradiculopathy
Red Cross
Therapeutics
Neurologic Manifestations
Observation
Conservative Treatment

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Spontaneous regression of posterior epidural migrated lumbar disc fragments : Case series. / Tarukado, Kiyoshi; Ikuta, Ko; Fukutoku, Yoshiaki; Tono, Osamu; Doi, Toshio.

In: Spine Journal, Vol. 15, No. 6, 01.06.2015, p. e57-e62.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tarukado, Kiyoshi ; Ikuta, Ko ; Fukutoku, Yoshiaki ; Tono, Osamu ; Doi, Toshio. / Spontaneous regression of posterior epidural migrated lumbar disc fragments : Case series. In: Spine Journal. 2015 ; Vol. 15, No. 6. pp. e57-e62.
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abstract = "Background context Posterior epidural migrated lumbar disc fragments is an extremely rare disorder. Surgical treatment was performed in all reported cases. To the best of our knowledge, there are no reported cases of the use of conservative treatment for posterior epidural migrated lumbar disc fragments. Purpose To report the possibility of a spontaneous regression of posterior epidural migrated lumbar disc fragments. Study design Case series. Methods Four patients with posterior epidural migrated lumbar disc fragments were treated at Karatsu Red Cross Hospital between April 2008 and August 2010. Spontaneous regression of the posterior epidural migrated lumbar disc fragments with relief of symptoms was observed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in three cases. Another patient underwent surgical treatment. The present and previously reported cases of posterior epidural migrated lumbar disc fragments were analyzed with respect to patient age, imaging features on MRI, the level of the lesion, clinical symptoms, treatment, and outcomes. Results Conservative treatment was successful, and spontaneous lesion regression was seen on MRI with symptom relief in three cases. Conclusions Although posterior epidural migrated lumbar disc fragment cases are generally treated surgically, the condition can regress spontaneously over time, as do sequestrated disc fragments. Spontaneous regression of lumbar disc herniations is a widely accepted observation at present. Posterior epidural migrated lumbar disc fragments fall under the sequestrated type of disc herniation. In fact, the course of treatment for posterior epidural migrated lumbar disc fragments should be determined based on the symptoms and examination findings, as in cases of ordinary herniation. However, providing early surgical treatment is important if the patient has acute cauda equina syndrome or the neurologic symptoms worsen over time.",
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