STIM1 and STIM2 protein deficiency in T lymphocytes underlies development of the exocrine gland autoimmune disease, Sjögren's syndrome

Kwong Tai Cheng, Ilias Alevizos, Xibao Liu, Wiliam D. Swaim, Hongen Yin, Stefan Feske, Masatsugu Oh-hora, Indu S. Ambudkar

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    38 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Primary Sjögren's Syndrome (pSS) is an autoimmune disease involving salivary and other exocrine glands that leads to progressive lymphocytic infiltration into the gland, tissue damage, and secretory defects. The mechanism underlying this disease remains poorly understood. Here we report that mice with T-cell-targeted deletion of Stromal Interaction Molecule (STIM) 1 and STIM2 [double-knockout (DKO)] mice develop spontaneous and severe pSS-like autoimmune disease, displaying major hallmarks of the disease. In DKO mice, diffuse lymphocytic infiltration was seen in submandibular glands, a major target of pSS, by age 6 wk, progressing to severe inflammation by age 12 wk. Sjögren's syndrome-specific autoantibodies (SSA/Ro and SSB/La) were detected in the serum, and progressive salivary gland destruction and loss of fluid secretion were also seen. Importantly, we report that peripheral blood mononuclear cells as well as lymphocytic infiltrates in submandibular glands from patients with pSS demonstrated significant reductions in STIM1 and STIM2 proteins. Store-operated calcium entry was also reduced in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from pSS patients compared with those fromhealthy controls. Thus, deficiency of STIM1 and STIM2 proteins in T cells, and consequent defects in Ca2+ signaling, are associated with salivary gland autoimmunopathy in DKO mice and pSS patients. These data reveal a previously unreported link between STIM1 and STIM2 proteins and pSS.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)14544-14549
    Number of pages6
    JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
    Volume109
    Issue number36
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Sep 4 2012

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    Exocrine Glands
    Protein Deficiency
    Autoimmune Diseases
    T-Lymphocytes
    Knockout Mice
    Submandibular Gland
    Salivary Glands
    Blood Cells
    Fluids and Secretions
    Stromal Interaction Molecule 2
    Stromal Interaction Molecule 1
    Autoantibodies
    Inflammation
    Calcium

    All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

    • General

    Cite this

    STIM1 and STIM2 protein deficiency in T lymphocytes underlies development of the exocrine gland autoimmune disease, Sjögren's syndrome. / Cheng, Kwong Tai; Alevizos, Ilias; Liu, Xibao; Swaim, Wiliam D.; Yin, Hongen; Feske, Stefan; Oh-hora, Masatsugu; Ambudkar, Indu S.

    In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Vol. 109, No. 36, 04.09.2012, p. 14544-14549.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Cheng, Kwong Tai ; Alevizos, Ilias ; Liu, Xibao ; Swaim, Wiliam D. ; Yin, Hongen ; Feske, Stefan ; Oh-hora, Masatsugu ; Ambudkar, Indu S. / STIM1 and STIM2 protein deficiency in T lymphocytes underlies development of the exocrine gland autoimmune disease, Sjögren's syndrome. In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 2012 ; Vol. 109, No. 36. pp. 14544-14549.
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    abstract = "Primary Sj{\"o}gren's Syndrome (pSS) is an autoimmune disease involving salivary and other exocrine glands that leads to progressive lymphocytic infiltration into the gland, tissue damage, and secretory defects. The mechanism underlying this disease remains poorly understood. Here we report that mice with T-cell-targeted deletion of Stromal Interaction Molecule (STIM) 1 and STIM2 [double-knockout (DKO)] mice develop spontaneous and severe pSS-like autoimmune disease, displaying major hallmarks of the disease. In DKO mice, diffuse lymphocytic infiltration was seen in submandibular glands, a major target of pSS, by age 6 wk, progressing to severe inflammation by age 12 wk. Sj{\"o}gren's syndrome-specific autoantibodies (SSA/Ro and SSB/La) were detected in the serum, and progressive salivary gland destruction and loss of fluid secretion were also seen. Importantly, we report that peripheral blood mononuclear cells as well as lymphocytic infiltrates in submandibular glands from patients with pSS demonstrated significant reductions in STIM1 and STIM2 proteins. Store-operated calcium entry was also reduced in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from pSS patients compared with those fromhealthy controls. Thus, deficiency of STIM1 and STIM2 proteins in T cells, and consequent defects in Ca2+ signaling, are associated with salivary gland autoimmunopathy in DKO mice and pSS patients. These data reveal a previously unreported link between STIM1 and STIM2 proteins and pSS.",
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    AU - Yin, Hongen

    AU - Feske, Stefan

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