Stimulus meanings alter illusory self-motion (vection)-experimental examination of the train Illusion

Takeharu Seno, Haruaki Fukuda

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    18 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Over the last 100 years, numerous studies have examined the effective visual stimulus properties for inducing illusory self-motion (known as vection). This vection is often experienced more strongly in daily life than under controlled experimental conditions. One well-known example of vection in real life is the so-called 'train illusion'. In the present study, we showed that this train illusion can also be generated in the laboratory using virtual computer graphics-based motion stimuli.We also demonstrated that this vection can be modified by altering the meaning of the visual stimuli (i.e., top down effects). Importantly, we show that the semantic meaning of a stimulus can inhibit or facilitate vection, even when there is no physical change to the stimulus.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)631-645
    Number of pages15
    JournalSeeing and Perceiving
    Volume25
    Issue number6
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 2012

    All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

    • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
    • Ophthalmology
    • Sensory Systems
    • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
    • Cognitive Neuroscience

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