Strength characteristics of cement treated clayey and sandy soils in terms of overconsolidation ratio

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

The subject of this study is a cement treated soil, which is cement mixed soil. The cement treated soil has a number of advantages, for instance, the strength becomes larger than the soil before mixing. It also has tensile strength. Using these advantageous characteristics, in Japan, cement treated soil is widely used for waterfront projects to increase the bearing capacity of clayey ground and to prevent the liquefaction of sandy ground. From past studies, among with others, cement content and the type of soil are the most commonly recognized factors which affect the strength of cement treated soil. However, a main factor governing the strength has been unknown. The purpose of this study is to find out the main factor that affects the strength of cement treated soil. In this study, three kinds of cement treated soils are prepared by mixing cement with Ariake clay, Akita clean sand and Rokko decomposed granite and a series of undrained triaxial compression tests were performed. In this paper, based on the experimental findings, a concept to evaluate the strength of cement treated soil is discussed and a main factor governing the strength of cement treated soil is presented. The findings include: 1) The consolidation properties of cement treated clayey soil are similar to those of untreated clayey soil. 2) The strength properties can be characterized into normally consolidated region and overconsolidated region respectively in accordance with the consolidation yield stress. In the normally consolidated region, the failure envelopes are almost parallel to untreated soils and have an intercept depending on the cement content. In the overconsolidated region, the strength notably depends on the overconsolidation ratio irrespective of the cement content and the density of specimen. It is concluded that the consolidation yield stress and overconsolidation ratio are two most important factors in predicting the strength of cement treated soil.

Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2018
EventISRM International Symposium 2000, IS 2000 - Melbourne, Australia
Duration: Nov 19 2000Nov 24 2000

Other

OtherISRM International Symposium 2000, IS 2000
CountryAustralia
CityMelbourne
Period11/19/0011/24/00

Fingerprint

overconsolidation
Soil cement
cements
sandy soil
soils
Cements
cement
Soils
soil
Consolidation
consolidation
Yield stress
Liquefaction
Bearing capacity
stress ratio
Tensile strength
Sand
liquefaction

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Geochemistry and Petrology
  • Geophysics

Cite this

Kasama, K., & Zen, K. (2018). Strength characteristics of cement treated clayey and sandy soils in terms of overconsolidation ratio. Paper presented at ISRM International Symposium 2000, IS 2000, Melbourne, Australia.

Strength characteristics of cement treated clayey and sandy soils in terms of overconsolidation ratio. / Kasama, Kiyonobu; Zen, K.

2018. Paper presented at ISRM International Symposium 2000, IS 2000, Melbourne, Australia.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Kasama, K & Zen, K 2018, 'Strength characteristics of cement treated clayey and sandy soils in terms of overconsolidation ratio' Paper presented at ISRM International Symposium 2000, IS 2000, Melbourne, Australia, 11/19/00 - 11/24/00, .
Kasama K, Zen K. Strength characteristics of cement treated clayey and sandy soils in terms of overconsolidation ratio. 2018. Paper presented at ISRM International Symposium 2000, IS 2000, Melbourne, Australia.
Kasama, Kiyonobu ; Zen, K. / Strength characteristics of cement treated clayey and sandy soils in terms of overconsolidation ratio. Paper presented at ISRM International Symposium 2000, IS 2000, Melbourne, Australia.
@conference{e1d689f0e6f24ea98131a10b1c62ed58,
title = "Strength characteristics of cement treated clayey and sandy soils in terms of overconsolidation ratio",
abstract = "The subject of this study is a cement treated soil, which is cement mixed soil. The cement treated soil has a number of advantages, for instance, the strength becomes larger than the soil before mixing. It also has tensile strength. Using these advantageous characteristics, in Japan, cement treated soil is widely used for waterfront projects to increase the bearing capacity of clayey ground and to prevent the liquefaction of sandy ground. From past studies, among with others, cement content and the type of soil are the most commonly recognized factors which affect the strength of cement treated soil. However, a main factor governing the strength has been unknown. The purpose of this study is to find out the main factor that affects the strength of cement treated soil. In this study, three kinds of cement treated soils are prepared by mixing cement with Ariake clay, Akita clean sand and Rokko decomposed granite and a series of undrained triaxial compression tests were performed. In this paper, based on the experimental findings, a concept to evaluate the strength of cement treated soil is discussed and a main factor governing the strength of cement treated soil is presented. The findings include: 1) The consolidation properties of cement treated clayey soil are similar to those of untreated clayey soil. 2) The strength properties can be characterized into normally consolidated region and overconsolidated region respectively in accordance with the consolidation yield stress. In the normally consolidated region, the failure envelopes are almost parallel to untreated soils and have an intercept depending on the cement content. In the overconsolidated region, the strength notably depends on the overconsolidation ratio irrespective of the cement content and the density of specimen. It is concluded that the consolidation yield stress and overconsolidation ratio are two most important factors in predicting the strength of cement treated soil.",
author = "Kiyonobu Kasama and K. Zen",
year = "2018",
month = "1",
day = "1",
language = "English",
note = "ISRM International Symposium 2000, IS 2000 ; Conference date: 19-11-2000 Through 24-11-2000",

}

TY - CONF

T1 - Strength characteristics of cement treated clayey and sandy soils in terms of overconsolidation ratio

AU - Kasama, Kiyonobu

AU - Zen, K.

PY - 2018/1/1

Y1 - 2018/1/1

N2 - The subject of this study is a cement treated soil, which is cement mixed soil. The cement treated soil has a number of advantages, for instance, the strength becomes larger than the soil before mixing. It also has tensile strength. Using these advantageous characteristics, in Japan, cement treated soil is widely used for waterfront projects to increase the bearing capacity of clayey ground and to prevent the liquefaction of sandy ground. From past studies, among with others, cement content and the type of soil are the most commonly recognized factors which affect the strength of cement treated soil. However, a main factor governing the strength has been unknown. The purpose of this study is to find out the main factor that affects the strength of cement treated soil. In this study, three kinds of cement treated soils are prepared by mixing cement with Ariake clay, Akita clean sand and Rokko decomposed granite and a series of undrained triaxial compression tests were performed. In this paper, based on the experimental findings, a concept to evaluate the strength of cement treated soil is discussed and a main factor governing the strength of cement treated soil is presented. The findings include: 1) The consolidation properties of cement treated clayey soil are similar to those of untreated clayey soil. 2) The strength properties can be characterized into normally consolidated region and overconsolidated region respectively in accordance with the consolidation yield stress. In the normally consolidated region, the failure envelopes are almost parallel to untreated soils and have an intercept depending on the cement content. In the overconsolidated region, the strength notably depends on the overconsolidation ratio irrespective of the cement content and the density of specimen. It is concluded that the consolidation yield stress and overconsolidation ratio are two most important factors in predicting the strength of cement treated soil.

AB - The subject of this study is a cement treated soil, which is cement mixed soil. The cement treated soil has a number of advantages, for instance, the strength becomes larger than the soil before mixing. It also has tensile strength. Using these advantageous characteristics, in Japan, cement treated soil is widely used for waterfront projects to increase the bearing capacity of clayey ground and to prevent the liquefaction of sandy ground. From past studies, among with others, cement content and the type of soil are the most commonly recognized factors which affect the strength of cement treated soil. However, a main factor governing the strength has been unknown. The purpose of this study is to find out the main factor that affects the strength of cement treated soil. In this study, three kinds of cement treated soils are prepared by mixing cement with Ariake clay, Akita clean sand and Rokko decomposed granite and a series of undrained triaxial compression tests were performed. In this paper, based on the experimental findings, a concept to evaluate the strength of cement treated soil is discussed and a main factor governing the strength of cement treated soil is presented. The findings include: 1) The consolidation properties of cement treated clayey soil are similar to those of untreated clayey soil. 2) The strength properties can be characterized into normally consolidated region and overconsolidated region respectively in accordance with the consolidation yield stress. In the normally consolidated region, the failure envelopes are almost parallel to untreated soils and have an intercept depending on the cement content. In the overconsolidated region, the strength notably depends on the overconsolidation ratio irrespective of the cement content and the density of specimen. It is concluded that the consolidation yield stress and overconsolidation ratio are two most important factors in predicting the strength of cement treated soil.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85053928121&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85053928121&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Paper

ER -