Study on root absorption responding to environmental stress by using hydroponic systems

F. F.M. Affan, M. Kitano, D. Yasutake, T. Wajima, T. Yasunaga

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study deals with effects of high temperature stress and salt stress on root physiological functions by using the system newly developed for measurements of water and nutrients uptake by roots. Dynamic and simultaneous evaluation of rates of water and nutrients uptake by roots was enabled in the hydroponic system. Rates of water and nutrients uptake by roots were evaluated simultaneously on the basis of time courses analyses of water balance and nutrients balance in the system. Furthermore, the simultaneous evaluation of water and nutrients uptake rates enabled estimation of concentration of each nutrient in xylem sap. In the short-term (one or two weeks), the high root temperature activated water and nutrients uptake through decrease in water viscosity, and the salt stress significantly depressed water uptake rate through decrease in osmotic potential of the nutrient solution, which retarded mass flow in the nutrients uptake. On the other hand, the long-term (several weeks) of the high root temperature depressed water and nutrients uptake and resulted in growth depression and browning in roots. The long-term effects of the high root temperature were considered to relate to the reduced oxygen solubility and the increased enzymatic oxidization of phenolic compounds in root epidermal and cortex tissues. Thus, the short-term effects of the high root temperature and the salt stress were brought mainly through the physical processes, and the long-term effects of the high root temperature were brought through the physiological processes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)223-228
Number of pages6
JournalPhyton - Annales Rei Botanicae
Volume45
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - Oct 1 2005

Fingerprint

Hydroponics
hydroponics
environmental stress
water uptake
nutrient uptake
Water
Temperature
salt stress
temperature
Salts
long term effects
salt
mass flow
nutrient balance
Physical Phenomena
Physiological Phenomena
Xylem
osmotic pressure
Food
water balance

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Global and Planetary Change
  • Physiology
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Plant Science

Cite this

Study on root absorption responding to environmental stress by using hydroponic systems. / Affan, F. F.M.; Kitano, M.; Yasutake, D.; Wajima, T.; Yasunaga, T.

In: Phyton - Annales Rei Botanicae, Vol. 45, No. 4, 01.10.2005, p. 223-228.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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