Study on the development of agricultural machines for small-scale farmers, part 2 (applied technology to the improvement of an animal-drawn plow for Morocco and Africa)

Toshiyuki Tsujimoto, Koichi Hashiguchi, Hai Sakurai, Eiji Inoue

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The purpose of this research is to improve the working performance of the animal-drawn plow for smallscale farmers in Africa, as based on conditions in Morocco. Animaltraction farming is not widespread in Africa, except in a few regions. Furthermore, tractor cultivation is still difficult for small-scale farmers due to economic constraints and the need for shared use of machines, which involves solving operational, technical and maintenance problems. The plowing depth with seedcovering cultivation is about 10 cm on the dry land of Morocco. Traction forces are, therefore, low during actual operation. As a result, stable operation of animal-drawn plows and subsequent reduction of the workload on the draft animals are being sought for farming operations. The minimizing of the standard deviation (SD) of measured data (amplitude of ranges) of the draft force was selected as the performance evaluation parameter for stable and efficient handling and for steady operation. Throughout these experiments contributing most to the uniformity of plow performance the longest plow sole (51 cm) turned out to be the element when draft force, required horsepower, stepping reduction rate, and operational stability were considered.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)14-20
Number of pages7
JournalAMA, Agricultural Mechanization in Asia, Africa and Latin America
Volume36
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2005

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences (miscellaneous)

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