Surface modification of a solid-state cellulose matrix with lactose by a surfactant-enveloped enzyme in a nonaqueous medium

Shizuka Egusa, Shingo Yokota, Kyoko Tanaka, Kei Esaki, Yuri Okutani, Yukiko Ogawa, Takuya Kitaoka, Masahiro Goto, Hiroyuki Wariishi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Glyco-modification of a solid cellulose surface with lactose via an enzymatic reaction was successfully achieved using a surfactant-enveloped enzyme (SEE) in a lithium chloride/dimethylacetamide solvent system. The unique biocatalyst, SEE, which is active in organic media, was prepared by protecting the surface of cellulase with the specific nonionic surfactant dioleyl-N-D-glucona-L-glutamate. Lactose, a second cellulase substrate, was introduced onto cellulose surfaces via SEE-mediated enzymatic reaction. Fluorescent labeling and imaging revealed the presence of galactose residues from lactose on the modified cellulose surface. X-Ray diffractometry showed that the crystal structure of cellulose remained unchanged even after glyco-modification. Cell adhesion assays were carried out using rat liver cells on which galactose-specific receptors are present, and the initial cell attachment (within 12 h) on the lactose-modified cellulose filter was greater than that on an original (unmodified) cellulose matrix. The SEE-mediated biocatalysis enabled efficient glyco-modification of the solid cellulose surface in a one-step reaction, without complicated pre-treatment of the cellulose matrix and donor sugar. Consequently, this simple and effective approach to surface modification of a solid cellulose matrix with bio-functional sugars would be expected to have wide potential applications in glycomaterials engineering.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1836-1842
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Materials Chemistry
Volume19
Issue number13
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 24 2009

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Lactose
Surface-Active Agents
Cellulose
Surface treatment
Surface active agents
Enzymes
Cellulase
Galactose
Sugars
Lithium Chloride
Biocatalysts
Cell adhesion
Nonionic surfactants
Liver
Labeling
X ray diffraction analysis
Rats
Glutamic Acid
Assays
Lithium

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Materials Chemistry

Cite this

Surface modification of a solid-state cellulose matrix with lactose by a surfactant-enveloped enzyme in a nonaqueous medium. / Egusa, Shizuka; Yokota, Shingo; Tanaka, Kyoko; Esaki, Kei; Okutani, Yuri; Ogawa, Yukiko; Kitaoka, Takuya; Goto, Masahiro; Wariishi, Hiroyuki.

In: Journal of Materials Chemistry, Vol. 19, No. 13, 24.03.2009, p. 1836-1842.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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