Surface plasmon resonance and surface plasmon field-enhanced fluorescence spectroscopy for sensitive detection of tumor markers.

Yusuke Arima, Yuji Teramura, Hiromi Takiguchi, Keiko Kawano, Hidetoshi Kotera, Hiroo Iwata

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Surface plasmon resonance (SPR), which provides real-time, in situ analysis of dynamic surface events, is a valuable tool for studying interactions between biomolecules. In the clinical diagnosis of tumor markers in human blood, SPR is applied to detect the formation of a sandwich-type immune complex composed of a primary antibody immobilized on a sensor surface, the tumor marker, and a secondary antibody. However, the SPR signal is quite low due to the minute amounts (ng-pg/mL) of most tumor markers in blood. We have shown that the SPR signal can be amplified by applying an antibody against the secondary antibody or streptavidin-conjugated nanobeads that specifically accumulate on the secondary antibody. Another method employed for highly sensitive detection is the surface plasmon field-enhanced fluorescence spectroscopy-based immunoassay, which utilizes the enhanced electric field intensity at a metal/water interface to excite a fluorophore. Fluorescence intensity attributed to binding of a fluorophore-labeled secondary antibody is increased due to the enhanced field in the SPR condition and can be monitored in real time.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3-20
Number of pages18
JournalMethods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.)
Volume503
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2009

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Surface Plasmon Resonance
Fluorescence Spectrometry
Tumor Biomarkers
Antibodies
Immobilized Antibodies
Streptavidin
Antigen-Antibody Complex
Immunoassay
Fluorescence
Metals
Water

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics

Cite this

Surface plasmon resonance and surface plasmon field-enhanced fluorescence spectroscopy for sensitive detection of tumor markers. / Arima, Yusuke; Teramura, Yuji; Takiguchi, Hiromi; Kawano, Keiko; Kotera, Hidetoshi; Iwata, Hiroo.

In: Methods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.), Vol. 503, 01.01.2009, p. 3-20.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Arima, Yusuke ; Teramura, Yuji ; Takiguchi, Hiromi ; Kawano, Keiko ; Kotera, Hidetoshi ; Iwata, Hiroo. / Surface plasmon resonance and surface plasmon field-enhanced fluorescence spectroscopy for sensitive detection of tumor markers. In: Methods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.). 2009 ; Vol. 503. pp. 3-20.
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