Targeted gene transfer to corneal stroma in vivo by electric pulses

Yuji Oshima, Taiji Sakamoto, Toshio Hisatomi, Chikako Tsutsumi, Yukio Sassa, Tatsuro Ishibashi, Hajime Inomata

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study was conducted to develop a method of targeted gene transfer by electric pulses to a selected area of corneal stroma in vivo. Plasmid DNA with a green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene under a cytomegalovirus promoter was injected through the corneal pocket into the corneal stroma of the adult Brown Norway rat, and various intensities of electric pulses ranging from 10 to 30 V were delivered to the corneal epithelial side with an electric probe. Direct stereomicroscopy of the fluorescent using realtime imaging was used to determine in vivo gene expression on days 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 15, and 20 after gene transfer. Transgene expression was detected in the corneal stroma as early as day 1 and until day 15. The most intense expression was noted on days 4 and 6. Gene transfer was most effective using eight electric pulses of 20 V for 50 msec. Histologic study disclosed GFP expression in keratocytes within the targeted area. There was no apparent cell damage in the gene transferred cells. No apparent inflammation was found in the anterior chamber or trabecular cells when electric pulses less than 30 V were used. In summary, the present technique transferred the gene of interest to a highly selected area of corneal stroma with no apparent damage. This method will likely be useful not only for developing gene therapy for corneal diseases but also for corneal research in general.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)191-198
Number of pages8
JournalExperimental Eye Research
Volume74
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2002

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Corneal Stroma
Genes
Green Fluorescent Proteins
Corneal Diseases
Anterior Chamber
Cytomegalovirus
Transgenes
Genetic Therapy
Plasmids
Inflammation
Gene Expression
DNA
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ophthalmology
  • Sensory Systems
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Cite this

Oshima, Y., Sakamoto, T., Hisatomi, T., Tsutsumi, C., Sassa, Y., Ishibashi, T., & Inomata, H. (2002). Targeted gene transfer to corneal stroma in vivo by electric pulses. Experimental Eye Research, 74(2), 191-198. https://doi.org/10.1006/exer.2001.1117

Targeted gene transfer to corneal stroma in vivo by electric pulses. / Oshima, Yuji; Sakamoto, Taiji; Hisatomi, Toshio; Tsutsumi, Chikako; Sassa, Yukio; Ishibashi, Tatsuro; Inomata, Hajime.

In: Experimental Eye Research, Vol. 74, No. 2, 01.01.2002, p. 191-198.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Oshima, Y, Sakamoto, T, Hisatomi, T, Tsutsumi, C, Sassa, Y, Ishibashi, T & Inomata, H 2002, 'Targeted gene transfer to corneal stroma in vivo by electric pulses', Experimental Eye Research, vol. 74, no. 2, pp. 191-198. https://doi.org/10.1006/exer.2001.1117
Oshima, Yuji ; Sakamoto, Taiji ; Hisatomi, Toshio ; Tsutsumi, Chikako ; Sassa, Yukio ; Ishibashi, Tatsuro ; Inomata, Hajime. / Targeted gene transfer to corneal stroma in vivo by electric pulses. In: Experimental Eye Research. 2002 ; Vol. 74, No. 2. pp. 191-198.
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