Tauopathy in basal ganglia involvement is exacerbated in a subset of patients with Alzheimer's disease: The Hisayama study

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Abstract

Introduction: We have conducted the pathological cohort study of autopsied cases of Hisayama residents to reveal a recent trend of dementia-related pathology. We noticed a trend of putaminal involvement of Alzheimer's disease (AD) with parkinsonism. Then, we investigated the accurate prevalence of neurological diseases with putaminal AD pathology in the general population. Methods: We examined a series of 291 autopsies in the Hisayama study and performed image analysis of immunohistochemistry for microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT) and amyloid β. Results: Approximately 65.6% and 36.1% of cases showed putaminal MAPT and amyloid deposits, respectively. Diffuse deposits of them were mainly found in the AD cases. Putaminal MAPT was highly associated with AD-related pathological criteria. Four of 22 cases with severe putaminal MAPT deposition were documented as having developed parkinsonism. Discussion: Severe MAPT accumulation in the basal ganglia was closely related to the development of AD pathology and could occur most frequently in AD cases without comorbidities.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)415-423
Number of pages9
JournalAlzheimer's and Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment and Disease Monitoring
Volume11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 2019

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Tauopathies
Basal Ganglia
Microtubule-Associated Proteins
Alzheimer Disease
Parkinsonian Disorders
Pathology
Amyloid Plaques
Amyloid
Dementia
Comorbidity
Autopsy
Cohort Studies
Immunohistochemistry
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

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title = "Tauopathy in basal ganglia involvement is exacerbated in a subset of patients with Alzheimer's disease: The Hisayama study",
abstract = "Introduction: We have conducted the pathological cohort study of autopsied cases of Hisayama residents to reveal a recent trend of dementia-related pathology. We noticed a trend of putaminal involvement of Alzheimer's disease (AD) with parkinsonism. Then, we investigated the accurate prevalence of neurological diseases with putaminal AD pathology in the general population. Methods: We examined a series of 291 autopsies in the Hisayama study and performed image analysis of immunohistochemistry for microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT) and amyloid β. Results: Approximately 65.6{\%} and 36.1{\%} of cases showed putaminal MAPT and amyloid deposits, respectively. Diffuse deposits of them were mainly found in the AD cases. Putaminal MAPT was highly associated with AD-related pathological criteria. Four of 22 cases with severe putaminal MAPT deposition were documented as having developed parkinsonism. Discussion: Severe MAPT accumulation in the basal ganglia was closely related to the development of AD pathology and could occur most frequently in AD cases without comorbidities.",
author = "Hideomi Hamasaki and Hiroyuki Honda and Satoshi Suzuki and Masahiro Shijo and Tomoyuki Ohara and Yozo Hatabe and Tsuyoshi Okamoto and Toshiharu Ninomiya and Toru Iwaki",
year = "2019",
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language = "English",
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pages = "415--423",
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publisher = "Elsevier BV",

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TY - JOUR

T1 - Tauopathy in basal ganglia involvement is exacerbated in a subset of patients with Alzheimer's disease

T2 - The Hisayama study

AU - Hamasaki, Hideomi

AU - Honda, Hiroyuki

AU - Suzuki, Satoshi

AU - Shijo, Masahiro

AU - Ohara, Tomoyuki

AU - Hatabe, Yozo

AU - Okamoto, Tsuyoshi

AU - Ninomiya, Toshiharu

AU - Iwaki, Toru

PY - 2019/12/1

Y1 - 2019/12/1

N2 - Introduction: We have conducted the pathological cohort study of autopsied cases of Hisayama residents to reveal a recent trend of dementia-related pathology. We noticed a trend of putaminal involvement of Alzheimer's disease (AD) with parkinsonism. Then, we investigated the accurate prevalence of neurological diseases with putaminal AD pathology in the general population. Methods: We examined a series of 291 autopsies in the Hisayama study and performed image analysis of immunohistochemistry for microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT) and amyloid β. Results: Approximately 65.6% and 36.1% of cases showed putaminal MAPT and amyloid deposits, respectively. Diffuse deposits of them were mainly found in the AD cases. Putaminal MAPT was highly associated with AD-related pathological criteria. Four of 22 cases with severe putaminal MAPT deposition were documented as having developed parkinsonism. Discussion: Severe MAPT accumulation in the basal ganglia was closely related to the development of AD pathology and could occur most frequently in AD cases without comorbidities.

AB - Introduction: We have conducted the pathological cohort study of autopsied cases of Hisayama residents to reveal a recent trend of dementia-related pathology. We noticed a trend of putaminal involvement of Alzheimer's disease (AD) with parkinsonism. Then, we investigated the accurate prevalence of neurological diseases with putaminal AD pathology in the general population. Methods: We examined a series of 291 autopsies in the Hisayama study and performed image analysis of immunohistochemistry for microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT) and amyloid β. Results: Approximately 65.6% and 36.1% of cases showed putaminal MAPT and amyloid deposits, respectively. Diffuse deposits of them were mainly found in the AD cases. Putaminal MAPT was highly associated with AD-related pathological criteria. Four of 22 cases with severe putaminal MAPT deposition were documented as having developed parkinsonism. Discussion: Severe MAPT accumulation in the basal ganglia was closely related to the development of AD pathology and could occur most frequently in AD cases without comorbidities.

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