Temporal regulation of chromatin during myoblast differentiation

Akihito Harada, Yasuyuki Ohkawa, Anthony N. Imbalzano

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The commitment to and execution of differentiation programmes involves a significant change in gene expression in the precursor cell to facilitate development of the mature cell type. In addition to being regulated by lineage-determining and auxiliary transcription factors that drive these changes, the structural status of the chromatin has a considerable impact on the transcriptional competence of differentiation-specific genes, which is clearly demonstrated by the large number of cofactors and the extraordinary complex mechanisms by which these genes become activated. The terminal differentiation of myoblasts to myotubes and mature skeletal muscle is an excellent system to illustrate these points. The MyoD family of closely related, lineage-determining transcription factors directs, largely through targeting to chromatin, a cascade of cooperating transcription factors and enzymes that incorporate or remove variant histones, post-translationally modify histones, and alter nucleosome structure and positioning via energy released by ATP hydrolysis. The coordinated action of these transcription factors and enzymes prevents expression of differentiation-specific genes in myoblasts and facilitates the transition of these genes from transcriptionally repressed to activated during the differentiation process. Regulation is achieved in both a temporal as well as spatial manner, as at least some of these factors and enzymes affect local chromatin structure at myogenic gene regulatory sequences as well as higher-order genome organization. Here we discuss the transition of genes that promote myoblast differentiation from the silenced to the activated state with an emphasis on the changes that occur to individual histones and the chromatin structure present at these loci.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)77-86
Number of pages10
JournalSeminars in Cell and Developmental Biology
Volume72
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 2017

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Myoblasts
Chromatin
Transcription Factors
Histones
Genes
Enzymes
Nucleosomes
Skeletal Muscle Fibers
Regulator Genes
Mental Competency
Skeletal Muscle
Hydrolysis
Adenosine Triphosphate
Genome
Gene Expression

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Developmental Biology
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Temporal regulation of chromatin during myoblast differentiation. / Harada, Akihito; Ohkawa, Yasuyuki; Imbalzano, Anthony N.

In: Seminars in Cell and Developmental Biology, Vol. 72, 01.12.2017, p. 77-86.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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