The archaeology of Japan: From the earliest rice farming villages to the rise of the state

Research output: Book/ReportBook

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This is the first book-length study of the Yayoi and Kofun periods of Japan (c. 600 BC – 700 AD), in which the introduction of rice paddy-field farming from the Korean peninsula ignited the rapid development of social complexity and hierarchy that culminated with the formation of the ancient Japanese state. The author traces the historical trajectory of the Yayoi and Kofun periods by employing cutting-edge sociological, anthropological, and archaeological theories and methods. The book reveals a fascinating process through which sophisticated hunting-gathering communities in an archipelago on the eastern fringe of the Eurasian continent were transformed materially and symbolically into a state.

Original languageEnglish
PublisherCambridge University Press
Number of pages371
ISBN (Electronic)9781139034265
ISBN (Print)9780521884907
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2012

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Arts and Humanities(all)

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