The comparative effects of intensive glucose lowering in diabetes patients aged below or above 65 years: Results from the ADVANCE trial

Toshiaki Ohkuma, John Chalmers, Mark Cooper, Pavel Hamet, Stephen Harrap, Michel Marre, Giuseppe Mancia, Neil Poulter, Mark Woodward

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Aims: For relatively old patients with diabetes, current guidelines recommend adjustment of glycaemic goals based on patients' cognitive function, or coexisting chronic illnesses. However, the evidence which supports the efficacy and safety of intensive glucose lowering in older patients with diabetes is scarce. The objective of the present study was to compare the efficacy and safety of intensive glucose lowering in patients with type 2 diabetes stratified by age (<65 and ≥ 65 years), and examine whether the effects differ according to patients’ characteristics in the older patient group. Materials and Methods: The effects of intensive glucose lowering (to a target glycated haemoglobin [HbA1c] concentration of ≤48 mmol/mol [6.5%]) on major clinical outcomes were evaluated by Cox regression models according to subgroups defined by baseline age of <65 or ≥ 65 years in the ADVANCE trial (n = 11 140). Results: Over a median follow-up of 5 years, intensive glucose lowering significantly decreased the risk of the composite of major macrovascular and microvascular events (hazard ratio 0.90, 95% confidence interval 0.82-0.98), with no heterogeneity in the effects across age subgroups (p for heterogeneity = 0.44). Relative effects on all-cause death, cardiovascular death, and components of major vascular events were also similar (P for heterogeneity ≥0.06), except for severe hypoglycaemia, which was of greater risk for patients aged <65 years. Absolute benefits and harms were broadly consistent across subgroups. Among patients aged ≥65 years, randomized treatment effects did not differ significantly across different levels of cognitive function or coexisting chronic illnesses. Conclusions: Our results suggest that an intensive glycaemic control strategy to reduce HbA1c to 48 mmol/mol (6.5%) provided broadly similar benefits and harms and may be recommended for older, as well as younger, patients.

Original languageEnglish
JournalDiabetes, Obesity and Metabolism
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2021

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology

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