The difference of perceived loudness of sounds between men and women

Mariko Hamamura, Manami Aono, Shin-Ichiro Iwamiya

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Previous studies have reported gender differences in loudness perception. In order to clarify factor that affect loudness perception of men and women, so that differences in their processing of auditory stimuli might be revealed, we conducted four experiments using innovative experimental approaches. A rating experiment employed a wider range of sound stimuli and a greater number of categories on the verbal interval scale to elicit participants' ratings of sounds at different sound pressure levels, from "Barely audible" to "Unbearably loud." As in previous studies, male participants tended to rate the same sounds as less loud than did the females. An experiment with the method of adjustment measured the limits of sound pressure level perceived as soft or as loud, and replicated the gender effect: females selected lower levels than did males to represent both soft and loud sound categories. The final two experiments sought to measure perceived loudness on a (numeric) ratio scale rather than a (verbal) interval scale. Using the methods of magnitude estimation and magnitude production, these experiments did not produce the clear genderdifferences seen in the first two experiments. Differences in loudness judgments between males and females may actually reflect differences in the use of verbal expression rather than differences in perception of intensity.

Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2015
Event44th International Congress and Exposition on Noise Control Engineering, INTER-NOISE 2015 - San Francisco, United States
Duration: Aug 9 2015Aug 12 2015

Other

Other44th International Congress and Exposition on Noise Control Engineering, INTER-NOISE 2015
CountryUnited States
CitySan Francisco
Period8/9/158/12/15

Fingerprint

loudness
acoustics
ratings
sound pressure
auditory stimuli
scale (ratio)
intervals
stimuli
adjusting

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Acoustics and Ultrasonics

Cite this

Hamamura, M., Aono, M., & Iwamiya, S-I. (2015). The difference of perceived loudness of sounds between men and women. Paper presented at 44th International Congress and Exposition on Noise Control Engineering, INTER-NOISE 2015, San Francisco, United States.

The difference of perceived loudness of sounds between men and women. / Hamamura, Mariko; Aono, Manami; Iwamiya, Shin-Ichiro.

2015. Paper presented at 44th International Congress and Exposition on Noise Control Engineering, INTER-NOISE 2015, San Francisco, United States.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Hamamura, M, Aono, M & Iwamiya, S-I 2015, 'The difference of perceived loudness of sounds between men and women' Paper presented at 44th International Congress and Exposition on Noise Control Engineering, INTER-NOISE 2015, San Francisco, United States, 8/9/15 - 8/12/15, .
Hamamura M, Aono M, Iwamiya S-I. The difference of perceived loudness of sounds between men and women. 2015. Paper presented at 44th International Congress and Exposition on Noise Control Engineering, INTER-NOISE 2015, San Francisco, United States.
Hamamura, Mariko ; Aono, Manami ; Iwamiya, Shin-Ichiro. / The difference of perceived loudness of sounds between men and women. Paper presented at 44th International Congress and Exposition on Noise Control Engineering, INTER-NOISE 2015, San Francisco, United States.
@conference{472c1e27347946e08b8eaca7df276f7b,
title = "The difference of perceived loudness of sounds between men and women",
abstract = "Previous studies have reported gender differences in loudness perception. In order to clarify factor that affect loudness perception of men and women, so that differences in their processing of auditory stimuli might be revealed, we conducted four experiments using innovative experimental approaches. A rating experiment employed a wider range of sound stimuli and a greater number of categories on the verbal interval scale to elicit participants' ratings of sounds at different sound pressure levels, from {"}Barely audible{"} to {"}Unbearably loud.{"} As in previous studies, male participants tended to rate the same sounds as less loud than did the females. An experiment with the method of adjustment measured the limits of sound pressure level perceived as soft or as loud, and replicated the gender effect: females selected lower levels than did males to represent both soft and loud sound categories. The final two experiments sought to measure perceived loudness on a (numeric) ratio scale rather than a (verbal) interval scale. Using the methods of magnitude estimation and magnitude production, these experiments did not produce the clear genderdifferences seen in the first two experiments. Differences in loudness judgments between males and females may actually reflect differences in the use of verbal expression rather than differences in perception of intensity.",
author = "Mariko Hamamura and Manami Aono and Shin-Ichiro Iwamiya",
year = "2015",
month = "1",
day = "1",
language = "English",
note = "44th International Congress and Exposition on Noise Control Engineering, INTER-NOISE 2015 ; Conference date: 09-08-2015 Through 12-08-2015",

}

TY - CONF

T1 - The difference of perceived loudness of sounds between men and women

AU - Hamamura, Mariko

AU - Aono, Manami

AU - Iwamiya, Shin-Ichiro

PY - 2015/1/1

Y1 - 2015/1/1

N2 - Previous studies have reported gender differences in loudness perception. In order to clarify factor that affect loudness perception of men and women, so that differences in their processing of auditory stimuli might be revealed, we conducted four experiments using innovative experimental approaches. A rating experiment employed a wider range of sound stimuli and a greater number of categories on the verbal interval scale to elicit participants' ratings of sounds at different sound pressure levels, from "Barely audible" to "Unbearably loud." As in previous studies, male participants tended to rate the same sounds as less loud than did the females. An experiment with the method of adjustment measured the limits of sound pressure level perceived as soft or as loud, and replicated the gender effect: females selected lower levels than did males to represent both soft and loud sound categories. The final two experiments sought to measure perceived loudness on a (numeric) ratio scale rather than a (verbal) interval scale. Using the methods of magnitude estimation and magnitude production, these experiments did not produce the clear genderdifferences seen in the first two experiments. Differences in loudness judgments between males and females may actually reflect differences in the use of verbal expression rather than differences in perception of intensity.

AB - Previous studies have reported gender differences in loudness perception. In order to clarify factor that affect loudness perception of men and women, so that differences in their processing of auditory stimuli might be revealed, we conducted four experiments using innovative experimental approaches. A rating experiment employed a wider range of sound stimuli and a greater number of categories on the verbal interval scale to elicit participants' ratings of sounds at different sound pressure levels, from "Barely audible" to "Unbearably loud." As in previous studies, male participants tended to rate the same sounds as less loud than did the females. An experiment with the method of adjustment measured the limits of sound pressure level perceived as soft or as loud, and replicated the gender effect: females selected lower levels than did males to represent both soft and loud sound categories. The final two experiments sought to measure perceived loudness on a (numeric) ratio scale rather than a (verbal) interval scale. Using the methods of magnitude estimation and magnitude production, these experiments did not produce the clear genderdifferences seen in the first two experiments. Differences in loudness judgments between males and females may actually reflect differences in the use of verbal expression rather than differences in perception of intensity.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84947587000&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84947587000&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Paper

ER -