The effect of ionizing radiation on uranophane

Satoshi Utsunomiya, Lu Min Wang, Matt Douglas, Susan B. Clark, Rodney C. Ewing

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The susceptibility of uranophane, a uranyl sheet silicate, ideally Ca(UO2)2(SiO3OH)2(H2 (H2O)5, to ionizing irradiation has been evaluated by systematic irradations with 200 ke V electrons over the temperature range 94 to 573 K. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy revealed that amorphous domains formed locally, concurrently with a gradual disordering of the entire structure. Amorphization doses at room temperature were 1.1 × 1010 Gy for uranophane, 1.3 × 1010 Gy for Sr-substituted uranophane, and 1.9 × 1010 Gy for Eu-substituted uranophane; thus, there was an increase in amorphization dose with increasing average atomic mass. At 573 K, the amorphization dose of uranophane was 2.0 × 1011 Gy. The temperature dependence of the amorphization dose of uranophane has two stages; ≤413 K and >413 K. Based on a defect accumulation model, the effective activation energies for amorphization at each stage are 0.0440 eV and 0.869 eV, respectively. This suggests that the presence of H2O (and OH-) reduce the energy deposition required to cause amorphization. Above 413 K, the amorphization dose increased due to the absence of H2O and OH- and the absence of radiolytic decomposition of H2O and OH-.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)159-166
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Mineralogist
Volume88
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2003

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Amorphization
Ionizing radiation
ionizing radiation
dosage
atomic weights
temperature
phyllosilicate
activation energy
Silicates
defect
transmission electron microscopy
silicates
irradiation
High resolution transmission electron microscopy
effect
ionising radiation
dose
decomposition
Temperature
magnetic permeability

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Geophysics
  • Geochemistry and Petrology

Cite this

Utsunomiya, S., Wang, L. M., Douglas, M., Clark, S. B., & Ewing, R. C. (2003). The effect of ionizing radiation on uranophane. American Mineralogist, 88(1), 159-166. https://doi.org/10.2138/am-2003-0119

The effect of ionizing radiation on uranophane. / Utsunomiya, Satoshi; Wang, Lu Min; Douglas, Matt; Clark, Susan B.; Ewing, Rodney C.

In: American Mineralogist, Vol. 88, No. 1, 01.01.2003, p. 159-166.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Utsunomiya, S, Wang, LM, Douglas, M, Clark, SB & Ewing, RC 2003, 'The effect of ionizing radiation on uranophane', American Mineralogist, vol. 88, no. 1, pp. 159-166. https://doi.org/10.2138/am-2003-0119
Utsunomiya, Satoshi ; Wang, Lu Min ; Douglas, Matt ; Clark, Susan B. ; Ewing, Rodney C. / The effect of ionizing radiation on uranophane. In: American Mineralogist. 2003 ; Vol. 88, No. 1. pp. 159-166.
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