The evolution of sex differences in mate-attracting signalling

Kenji Yoshida, Yoh Iwasa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Question: To attract mates, many insects dance, have conspicuous plumage, call vocally, and emit signals such as pheromones. Mate-attracting signals are produced predominantly by males in some species and by females in others. We ask, which sex should evolve to produce mate-attracting signals? Method: We used a quantitative genetic model for the signal-sending and signal-receiving efforts of the two sexes. Mate-finding success is assumed to be a product of power functions of the signal sender's and signal receiver's investments. Results: If mate-finding success strongly depends on the investments of both senders and receivers, only one sex evolves to send the signals; otherwise, both sexes evolve to emit signals. Males evolve to assume the role that more strongly affects mate-finding success, and to engage in mate-finding activities with more investments than females.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)919-931
Number of pages13
JournalEvolutionary Ecology Research
Volume15
Issue number8
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Fingerprint

gender differences
gender
quantitative genetics
plumage
pheromones
insects
pheromone
insect
methodology

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics

Cite this

The evolution of sex differences in mate-attracting signalling. / Yoshida, Kenji; Iwasa, Yoh.

In: Evolutionary Ecology Research, Vol. 15, No. 8, 2013, p. 919-931.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yoshida, K & Iwasa, Y 2013, 'The evolution of sex differences in mate-attracting signalling', Evolutionary Ecology Research, vol. 15, no. 8, pp. 919-931.
Yoshida, Kenji ; Iwasa, Yoh. / The evolution of sex differences in mate-attracting signalling. In: Evolutionary Ecology Research. 2013 ; Vol. 15, No. 8. pp. 919-931.
@article{76eccdc0e1f445bba795cd495f7d877f,
title = "The evolution of sex differences in mate-attracting signalling",
abstract = "Question: To attract mates, many insects dance, have conspicuous plumage, call vocally, and emit signals such as pheromones. Mate-attracting signals are produced predominantly by males in some species and by females in others. We ask, which sex should evolve to produce mate-attracting signals? Method: We used a quantitative genetic model for the signal-sending and signal-receiving efforts of the two sexes. Mate-finding success is assumed to be a product of power functions of the signal sender's and signal receiver's investments. Results: If mate-finding success strongly depends on the investments of both senders and receivers, only one sex evolves to send the signals; otherwise, both sexes evolve to emit signals. Males evolve to assume the role that more strongly affects mate-finding success, and to engage in mate-finding activities with more investments than females.",
author = "Kenji Yoshida and Yoh Iwasa",
year = "2013",
language = "English",
volume = "15",
pages = "919--931",
journal = "Evolutionary Ecology Research",
issn = "1522-0613",
publisher = "Evolutionary Ecology Research",
number = "8",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The evolution of sex differences in mate-attracting signalling

AU - Yoshida, Kenji

AU - Iwasa, Yoh

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - Question: To attract mates, many insects dance, have conspicuous plumage, call vocally, and emit signals such as pheromones. Mate-attracting signals are produced predominantly by males in some species and by females in others. We ask, which sex should evolve to produce mate-attracting signals? Method: We used a quantitative genetic model for the signal-sending and signal-receiving efforts of the two sexes. Mate-finding success is assumed to be a product of power functions of the signal sender's and signal receiver's investments. Results: If mate-finding success strongly depends on the investments of both senders and receivers, only one sex evolves to send the signals; otherwise, both sexes evolve to emit signals. Males evolve to assume the role that more strongly affects mate-finding success, and to engage in mate-finding activities with more investments than females.

AB - Question: To attract mates, many insects dance, have conspicuous plumage, call vocally, and emit signals such as pheromones. Mate-attracting signals are produced predominantly by males in some species and by females in others. We ask, which sex should evolve to produce mate-attracting signals? Method: We used a quantitative genetic model for the signal-sending and signal-receiving efforts of the two sexes. Mate-finding success is assumed to be a product of power functions of the signal sender's and signal receiver's investments. Results: If mate-finding success strongly depends on the investments of both senders and receivers, only one sex evolves to send the signals; otherwise, both sexes evolve to emit signals. Males evolve to assume the role that more strongly affects mate-finding success, and to engage in mate-finding activities with more investments than females.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84901446302&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84901446302&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84901446302

VL - 15

SP - 919

EP - 931

JO - Evolutionary Ecology Research

JF - Evolutionary Ecology Research

SN - 1522-0613

IS - 8

ER -