The gravity-regulated growth of axillary buds is mediated by a mechanism different from decapitation-induced release

Daisuke Kitazawa, Yutaka Miyazawa, Nobuharu Fujii, Atsushi Hoshino, Shigeru Iida, Eiji Nitasaka, Hideyuki Takahashi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

When the upper part of the main shoot of the Japanese morning glory (Pharbitis nil or Ipomoea nil) is bent down, the axillary bud situated on the uppermost node of the bending region is released from apical dominance and elongates. Here, we demonstrate that this release of axillary buds from apical dominance is gravity regulated. We utilized two agravitropic mutants of morning glory defective in gravisensing cell differentiation, weeping (we) and weeping2 (we2). Bending the main shoots of either we or we2 plants resulted in minimal elongation of their axillary buds. This aberration was genetically linked to the agravitropism phenotype of the mutants, which implied that shoot bending-induced release from apical dominance required gravisensing cells. Previous studies have shown that basipetal translocation of auxin from the apical bud inhibits axillary bud growth, whereas cytokinin promotes axillary bud outgrowth. We therefore compared the roles of auxin and cytokinin in bending- or decapitation-induced axillary bud growth. In the wild-type and we plants, decapitation increased cytokinin levels and reduced auxin response. In contrast, shoot bending did not cause significant changes in either cytokinin level or auxin response, suggesting that the mechanisms underlying gravity- and decapitation-regulated release from apical dominance are distinct and unique.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)891-900
Number of pages10
JournalPlant and Cell Physiology
Volume49
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1 2008

Fingerprint

Decapitation
Cytokinins
Ipomoea nil
decapitation
Indoleacetic Acids
Gravitation
gravity
Gravity Sensing
buds
apical dominance
cytokinins
Growth
auxins
shoots
Cell Differentiation
mutants
Phenotype
cell differentiation
phenotype

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physiology
  • Plant Science
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

The gravity-regulated growth of axillary buds is mediated by a mechanism different from decapitation-induced release. / Kitazawa, Daisuke; Miyazawa, Yutaka; Fujii, Nobuharu; Hoshino, Atsushi; Iida, Shigeru; Nitasaka, Eiji; Takahashi, Hideyuki.

In: Plant and Cell Physiology, Vol. 49, No. 6, 01.06.2008, p. 891-900.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kitazawa, Daisuke ; Miyazawa, Yutaka ; Fujii, Nobuharu ; Hoshino, Atsushi ; Iida, Shigeru ; Nitasaka, Eiji ; Takahashi, Hideyuki. / The gravity-regulated growth of axillary buds is mediated by a mechanism different from decapitation-induced release. In: Plant and Cell Physiology. 2008 ; Vol. 49, No. 6. pp. 891-900.
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