The impact of taurine-and beta-alanine-supplemented diets on behavioral and neurochemical parameters in mice

Antidepressant versus anxiolytic-like effects

Tatsuro Murakami, Mitsuhiro Furuse

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

45 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Taurine, a substrate of taurine transporter, has functions as a neuromodulator and antioxidant and betaalanine, a taurine transporter inhibitor, has a role as a neurotransmitter in the brain, and they were expected to be involved in depression-like behavior and antidepressant treatment. These facts aroused our interest in new capabilities of taurine and beta-alanine. Thus, to investigate the effects of chronic ingestion of taurine-(22.5 mmol/kg diet) supplemented diet and beta-alanine-(22.5 mmol/kg diet) supplemented diet under acute stressful conditions, behavioral changes and brain metabolites were compared with mice fed a control diet. In the open field test, no significant difference was observed in locomotor activity among groups. In the elevated plus-maze test, however, significant increases in the percentage of time spent and entries in the open arms were observed in the beta-alanine supplemented diet fed group compared to both controls and animals fed with taurine-supplemented diet. Moreover, a significant decrease in the duration of immobility was observed in the taurine-supplemented diet group in the forced swimming test compared to both controls and animals fed with beta-alanine-supplemented diet. Taurine supplemented diet increased taurine and L-arginine concentrations in the hypothalamus. In contrast, beta-alanine-supplemented diet decreased the concentration of 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, a major metabolite of serotonin, in the hypothalamus. Beta-alanine-supplemented diet also increased carnosine (beta-alanyl-L-histidine) concentration in the cerebral cortex and hypothalamus, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor concentration in the hippocampus. These results suggested that taurine-supplemented diet had an antidepressant-like effect and betaalanine-supplemented diet had an anxiolytic-like effect.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)427-434
Number of pages8
JournalAmino Acids
Volume39
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2010

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beta-Alanine
Taurine
Anti-Anxiety Agents
Nutrition
Antidepressive Agents
Diet
Hypothalamus
Metabolites
Neurotransmitter Agents
Brain
Animals
Carnosine
Hydroxyindoleacetic Acid
Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor
Locomotion
Histidine
Cerebral Cortex

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Organic Chemistry

Cite this

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abstract = "Taurine, a substrate of taurine transporter, has functions as a neuromodulator and antioxidant and betaalanine, a taurine transporter inhibitor, has a role as a neurotransmitter in the brain, and they were expected to be involved in depression-like behavior and antidepressant treatment. These facts aroused our interest in new capabilities of taurine and beta-alanine. Thus, to investigate the effects of chronic ingestion of taurine-(22.5 mmol/kg diet) supplemented diet and beta-alanine-(22.5 mmol/kg diet) supplemented diet under acute stressful conditions, behavioral changes and brain metabolites were compared with mice fed a control diet. In the open field test, no significant difference was observed in locomotor activity among groups. In the elevated plus-maze test, however, significant increases in the percentage of time spent and entries in the open arms were observed in the beta-alanine supplemented diet fed group compared to both controls and animals fed with taurine-supplemented diet. Moreover, a significant decrease in the duration of immobility was observed in the taurine-supplemented diet group in the forced swimming test compared to both controls and animals fed with beta-alanine-supplemented diet. Taurine supplemented diet increased taurine and L-arginine concentrations in the hypothalamus. In contrast, beta-alanine-supplemented diet decreased the concentration of 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, a major metabolite of serotonin, in the hypothalamus. Beta-alanine-supplemented diet also increased carnosine (beta-alanyl-L-histidine) concentration in the cerebral cortex and hypothalamus, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor concentration in the hippocampus. These results suggested that taurine-supplemented diet had an antidepressant-like effect and betaalanine-supplemented diet had an anxiolytic-like effect.",
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