The increased contribution of atmospheric nitrogen deposition to nitrogen cycling in a rural forested area of Kyushu, Japan

Masaaki Chiwa, Tsutomu Enoki, Naoko Higashi, Tomo'Omi Kumagai, Kyoichi Otsuki

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Abstract

Japan has been receiving increasing levels of atmospheric nitrogenous pollutants from the East Asian continent over the last few decades, so it is critical to evaluate the impact of this increased atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition on N cycling even in rural forests. This study evaluated the contribution of the current level of atmospheric N deposition to N cycling in a rural forested area. Bulk precipitation and stream water were collected during 2007-2011 at the Shiiba Research Forest (SRF) located in the central Kyushu mountain range of southern Japan. Litterfall was also collected to investigate the contribution of atmospheric N deposition to total N input (litterfall N + atmospheric N deposition). The results showed that atmospheric depositions of both nitrate (NO3 -) and ammonium (NH4 +) were a few times higher during 2009-2011 than in 1991. This could be the result of additional N deposition from the increased long-range transport of nitrogenous pollutants from the East Asian continent. The current level of annual N deposition (9.7 kg N ha-1 year-1) at the SRF was comparable with that at many urban sites and was close to the reported threshold values causing N saturation in forest ecosystems. Although current atmospheric N deposition was an important component (23 %) of total N input (43 kg N ha -1 year-1) at the SRF, the concentrations of NO 3 - in stream water were consistently low (<10 μmol L-1). These results indicate that atmospheric N deposition is currently largely incorporated into forest ecosystems without excess N export from forested watersheds.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1763
JournalWater, Air, and Soil Pollution
Volume224
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2013

Fingerprint

Nitrogen
nitrogen
litterfall
forest ecosystem
Ecosystems
pollutant
urban site
long range transport
Water
atmospheric deposition
Watersheds
Ammonium Compounds
Nitrates
ammonium
watershed
saturation
nitrate
water

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Environmental Engineering
  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Ecological Modelling
  • Water Science and Technology
  • Pollution

Cite this

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abstract = "Japan has been receiving increasing levels of atmospheric nitrogenous pollutants from the East Asian continent over the last few decades, so it is critical to evaluate the impact of this increased atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition on N cycling even in rural forests. This study evaluated the contribution of the current level of atmospheric N deposition to N cycling in a rural forested area. Bulk precipitation and stream water were collected during 2007-2011 at the Shiiba Research Forest (SRF) located in the central Kyushu mountain range of southern Japan. Litterfall was also collected to investigate the contribution of atmospheric N deposition to total N input (litterfall N + atmospheric N deposition). The results showed that atmospheric depositions of both nitrate (NO3 -) and ammonium (NH4 +) were a few times higher during 2009-2011 than in 1991. This could be the result of additional N deposition from the increased long-range transport of nitrogenous pollutants from the East Asian continent. The current level of annual N deposition (9.7 kg N ha-1 year-1) at the SRF was comparable with that at many urban sites and was close to the reported threshold values causing N saturation in forest ecosystems. Although current atmospheric N deposition was an important component (23 {\%}) of total N input (43 kg N ha -1 year-1) at the SRF, the concentrations of NO 3 - in stream water were consistently low (<10 μmol L-1). These results indicate that atmospheric N deposition is currently largely incorporated into forest ecosystems without excess N export from forested watersheds.",
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AU - Otsuki, Kyoichi

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