The number of prehospital defibrillation shocks and 1-month survival in patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

Manabu Hasegawa, Takeru Abe, Takashi Nagata, Daisuke Onozuka, Akihito Hagihara

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Abstract

Background: The relationship between the number of pre-hospital defibrillation shocks and treatment outcome in patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) presenting with ventricular fibrillation (VF) is unknown currently. We examined the association between the number of pre-hospitalization defibrillation shocks and 1-month survival in OHCA patients. Methods: We conducted a prospective observational study using national registry data obtained from patients with OHCA between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2012 in Japan. The study subjects were ≥ 18-110 years of age, had suffered from an OHCA before arrival of EMS personnel, had a witnessed collapse, had an initial rhythm that was shockable [VF/ventricular tachycardia (pulseless VT)], were not delivered a shock using a public automated external defibrillator (AED), received one or more shocks using a biphasic defibrillator by EMS personnel, and were transported to a medical institution between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2012. There were 20,851 OHCA cases which met the inclusion criteria during the study period. Signal detection analysis was used to identify the cutoff point in the number of prehospital defibrillation shocks most closely related to one-month survival. Variables related to the number of defibrillations or one-month survival in OHCA were identified using multiple logistic regression analysis. Results: A cutoff point in the number of pre-hospital defibrillation shocks most closely associated with 1-month OHCA survival was between two and three (Χ2 = 209.61, p < 0.0001). Among those patients who received two shocks or less, 34.48% survived for at least 1 month, compared with 24.75% of those who received three shocks or more. The number of defibrillations (odds ratio [OR] = 1.19, 95% CI: 1.03, 1.38), OHCA origin (OR = 2.81, 95% CI: 2.26, 3.49), use of ALS devices (OR = 0.68, 95% CI: 0.59, 0.79), use of epinephrine (OR = 0.33, 95% C: 0.28, 0.39), interval between first defibrillation and first ROSC (OR = 1.45, 95% CI: 1.18, 1.78), and chest compression (OR = 1.21, 95% CI: 1.06, 1.38) were associated significantly with 1-month OCHA survival. Conclusions: The cutoff point in the number of defibrillations of patients with OHCA most closely related to one-month survival was between 2 and 3, and the likelihood of non-survival 1 month after an OHCA was increased when ≥3 shocks were needed. Further studies are needed to verify this finding.

Original languageEnglish
Article number34
JournalScandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine
Volume23
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 17 2015

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Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest
Shock
Survival
Odds Ratio
Defibrillators
Ventricular Fibrillation
Ventricular Tachycardia
Epinephrine
Observational Studies
Registries
Japan
Hospitalization
Thorax
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis
Prospective Studies

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Emergency Medicine
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

Cite this

The number of prehospital defibrillation shocks and 1-month survival in patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. / Hasegawa, Manabu; Abe, Takeru; Nagata, Takashi; Onozuka, Daisuke; Hagihara, Akihito.

In: Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, Vol. 23, No. 1, 34, 17.04.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Background: The relationship between the number of pre-hospital defibrillation shocks and treatment outcome in patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) presenting with ventricular fibrillation (VF) is unknown currently. We examined the association between the number of pre-hospitalization defibrillation shocks and 1-month survival in OHCA patients. Methods: We conducted a prospective observational study using national registry data obtained from patients with OHCA between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2012 in Japan. The study subjects were ≥ 18-110 years of age, had suffered from an OHCA before arrival of EMS personnel, had a witnessed collapse, had an initial rhythm that was shockable [VF/ventricular tachycardia (pulseless VT)], were not delivered a shock using a public automated external defibrillator (AED), received one or more shocks using a biphasic defibrillator by EMS personnel, and were transported to a medical institution between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2012. There were 20,851 OHCA cases which met the inclusion criteria during the study period. Signal detection analysis was used to identify the cutoff point in the number of prehospital defibrillation shocks most closely related to one-month survival. Variables related to the number of defibrillations or one-month survival in OHCA were identified using multiple logistic regression analysis. Results: A cutoff point in the number of pre-hospital defibrillation shocks most closely associated with 1-month OHCA survival was between two and three (Χ2 = 209.61, p < 0.0001). Among those patients who received two shocks or less, 34.48{\%} survived for at least 1 month, compared with 24.75{\%} of those who received three shocks or more. The number of defibrillations (odds ratio [OR] = 1.19, 95{\%} CI: 1.03, 1.38), OHCA origin (OR = 2.81, 95{\%} CI: 2.26, 3.49), use of ALS devices (OR = 0.68, 95{\%} CI: 0.59, 0.79), use of epinephrine (OR = 0.33, 95{\%} C: 0.28, 0.39), interval between first defibrillation and first ROSC (OR = 1.45, 95{\%} CI: 1.18, 1.78), and chest compression (OR = 1.21, 95{\%} CI: 1.06, 1.38) were associated significantly with 1-month OCHA survival. Conclusions: The cutoff point in the number of defibrillations of patients with OHCA most closely related to one-month survival was between 2 and 3, and the likelihood of non-survival 1 month after an OHCA was increased when ≥3 shocks were needed. Further studies are needed to verify this finding.",
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T1 - The number of prehospital defibrillation shocks and 1-month survival in patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

AU - Hasegawa, Manabu

AU - Abe, Takeru

AU - Nagata, Takashi

AU - Onozuka, Daisuke

AU - Hagihara, Akihito

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N2 - Background: The relationship between the number of pre-hospital defibrillation shocks and treatment outcome in patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) presenting with ventricular fibrillation (VF) is unknown currently. We examined the association between the number of pre-hospitalization defibrillation shocks and 1-month survival in OHCA patients. Methods: We conducted a prospective observational study using national registry data obtained from patients with OHCA between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2012 in Japan. The study subjects were ≥ 18-110 years of age, had suffered from an OHCA before arrival of EMS personnel, had a witnessed collapse, had an initial rhythm that was shockable [VF/ventricular tachycardia (pulseless VT)], were not delivered a shock using a public automated external defibrillator (AED), received one or more shocks using a biphasic defibrillator by EMS personnel, and were transported to a medical institution between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2012. There were 20,851 OHCA cases which met the inclusion criteria during the study period. Signal detection analysis was used to identify the cutoff point in the number of prehospital defibrillation shocks most closely related to one-month survival. Variables related to the number of defibrillations or one-month survival in OHCA were identified using multiple logistic regression analysis. Results: A cutoff point in the number of pre-hospital defibrillation shocks most closely associated with 1-month OHCA survival was between two and three (Χ2 = 209.61, p < 0.0001). Among those patients who received two shocks or less, 34.48% survived for at least 1 month, compared with 24.75% of those who received three shocks or more. The number of defibrillations (odds ratio [OR] = 1.19, 95% CI: 1.03, 1.38), OHCA origin (OR = 2.81, 95% CI: 2.26, 3.49), use of ALS devices (OR = 0.68, 95% CI: 0.59, 0.79), use of epinephrine (OR = 0.33, 95% C: 0.28, 0.39), interval between first defibrillation and first ROSC (OR = 1.45, 95% CI: 1.18, 1.78), and chest compression (OR = 1.21, 95% CI: 1.06, 1.38) were associated significantly with 1-month OCHA survival. Conclusions: The cutoff point in the number of defibrillations of patients with OHCA most closely related to one-month survival was between 2 and 3, and the likelihood of non-survival 1 month after an OHCA was increased when ≥3 shocks were needed. Further studies are needed to verify this finding.

AB - Background: The relationship between the number of pre-hospital defibrillation shocks and treatment outcome in patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) presenting with ventricular fibrillation (VF) is unknown currently. We examined the association between the number of pre-hospitalization defibrillation shocks and 1-month survival in OHCA patients. Methods: We conducted a prospective observational study using national registry data obtained from patients with OHCA between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2012 in Japan. The study subjects were ≥ 18-110 years of age, had suffered from an OHCA before arrival of EMS personnel, had a witnessed collapse, had an initial rhythm that was shockable [VF/ventricular tachycardia (pulseless VT)], were not delivered a shock using a public automated external defibrillator (AED), received one or more shocks using a biphasic defibrillator by EMS personnel, and were transported to a medical institution between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2012. There were 20,851 OHCA cases which met the inclusion criteria during the study period. Signal detection analysis was used to identify the cutoff point in the number of prehospital defibrillation shocks most closely related to one-month survival. Variables related to the number of defibrillations or one-month survival in OHCA were identified using multiple logistic regression analysis. Results: A cutoff point in the number of pre-hospital defibrillation shocks most closely associated with 1-month OHCA survival was between two and three (Χ2 = 209.61, p < 0.0001). Among those patients who received two shocks or less, 34.48% survived for at least 1 month, compared with 24.75% of those who received three shocks or more. The number of defibrillations (odds ratio [OR] = 1.19, 95% CI: 1.03, 1.38), OHCA origin (OR = 2.81, 95% CI: 2.26, 3.49), use of ALS devices (OR = 0.68, 95% CI: 0.59, 0.79), use of epinephrine (OR = 0.33, 95% C: 0.28, 0.39), interval between first defibrillation and first ROSC (OR = 1.45, 95% CI: 1.18, 1.78), and chest compression (OR = 1.21, 95% CI: 1.06, 1.38) were associated significantly with 1-month OCHA survival. Conclusions: The cutoff point in the number of defibrillations of patients with OHCA most closely related to one-month survival was between 2 and 3, and the likelihood of non-survival 1 month after an OHCA was increased when ≥3 shocks were needed. Further studies are needed to verify this finding.

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