The number of steps taken by flight attendants during international long-haul flights

A. Hagihara, K. Tarumi, K. Nobutomo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Previous studies have revealed that female cabin attendants on long flights are most likely to have health problems. Since health problems can be related to workload and work stress and since the number of steps taken by an employee during a work shift can be an objective measure of the work load of cabin attendants, it is necessary to evaluate the predictors of the number of steps. Methods: We used pedometers worn by 118 female flight attendants to study the number of steps during flights and its predictors during long international flights. Results:The mean number of steps during 636.53 (SD = 129.11)-minute flights was 10,742.85 (SD = 3,547.17). The crude number of steps per minute was 16.88, and the adjusted number of steps per minute was 14.04. Flight length and the number of sleeping hours worked (i.e., between midnight and 6:00 am) were significant predictors of the number of steps. Conclusion: Although it is implied that flight duration and night flight increase the work load of flight attendants, we need to consider psychological aspects to evaluate the overall effects of their jobs on work stress and health.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)937-939
Number of pages3
JournalAviation Space and Environmental Medicine
Volume72
Issue number10
Publication statusPublished - Oct 22 2001

Fingerprint

Workload
Health
Psychology

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

The number of steps taken by flight attendants during international long-haul flights. / Hagihara, A.; Tarumi, K.; Nobutomo, K.

In: Aviation Space and Environmental Medicine, Vol. 72, No. 10, 22.10.2001, p. 937-939.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hagihara, A. ; Tarumi, K. ; Nobutomo, K. / The number of steps taken by flight attendants during international long-haul flights. In: Aviation Space and Environmental Medicine. 2001 ; Vol. 72, No. 10. pp. 937-939.
@article{77a2197e57ba4d019064377b3e1181e9,
title = "The number of steps taken by flight attendants during international long-haul flights",
abstract = "Previous studies have revealed that female cabin attendants on long flights are most likely to have health problems. Since health problems can be related to workload and work stress and since the number of steps taken by an employee during a work shift can be an objective measure of the work load of cabin attendants, it is necessary to evaluate the predictors of the number of steps. Methods: We used pedometers worn by 118 female flight attendants to study the number of steps during flights and its predictors during long international flights. Results:The mean number of steps during 636.53 (SD = 129.11)-minute flights was 10,742.85 (SD = 3,547.17). The crude number of steps per minute was 16.88, and the adjusted number of steps per minute was 14.04. Flight length and the number of sleeping hours worked (i.e., between midnight and 6:00 am) were significant predictors of the number of steps. Conclusion: Although it is implied that flight duration and night flight increase the work load of flight attendants, we need to consider psychological aspects to evaluate the overall effects of their jobs on work stress and health.",
author = "A. Hagihara and K. Tarumi and K. Nobutomo",
year = "2001",
month = "10",
day = "22",
language = "English",
volume = "72",
pages = "937--939",
journal = "Aerospace medicine and human performance",
issn = "2375-6314",
publisher = "Aerospace Medical Association",
number = "10",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The number of steps taken by flight attendants during international long-haul flights

AU - Hagihara, A.

AU - Tarumi, K.

AU - Nobutomo, K.

PY - 2001/10/22

Y1 - 2001/10/22

N2 - Previous studies have revealed that female cabin attendants on long flights are most likely to have health problems. Since health problems can be related to workload and work stress and since the number of steps taken by an employee during a work shift can be an objective measure of the work load of cabin attendants, it is necessary to evaluate the predictors of the number of steps. Methods: We used pedometers worn by 118 female flight attendants to study the number of steps during flights and its predictors during long international flights. Results:The mean number of steps during 636.53 (SD = 129.11)-minute flights was 10,742.85 (SD = 3,547.17). The crude number of steps per minute was 16.88, and the adjusted number of steps per minute was 14.04. Flight length and the number of sleeping hours worked (i.e., between midnight and 6:00 am) were significant predictors of the number of steps. Conclusion: Although it is implied that flight duration and night flight increase the work load of flight attendants, we need to consider psychological aspects to evaluate the overall effects of their jobs on work stress and health.

AB - Previous studies have revealed that female cabin attendants on long flights are most likely to have health problems. Since health problems can be related to workload and work stress and since the number of steps taken by an employee during a work shift can be an objective measure of the work load of cabin attendants, it is necessary to evaluate the predictors of the number of steps. Methods: We used pedometers worn by 118 female flight attendants to study the number of steps during flights and its predictors during long international flights. Results:The mean number of steps during 636.53 (SD = 129.11)-minute flights was 10,742.85 (SD = 3,547.17). The crude number of steps per minute was 16.88, and the adjusted number of steps per minute was 14.04. Flight length and the number of sleeping hours worked (i.e., between midnight and 6:00 am) were significant predictors of the number of steps. Conclusion: Although it is implied that flight duration and night flight increase the work load of flight attendants, we need to consider psychological aspects to evaluate the overall effects of their jobs on work stress and health.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0034785346&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0034785346&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 11601559

AN - SCOPUS:0034785346

VL - 72

SP - 937

EP - 939

JO - Aerospace medicine and human performance

JF - Aerospace medicine and human performance

SN - 2375-6314

IS - 10

ER -