The number–time interaction depends on relative magnitude in the suprasecond range

Kentaro Yamamoto, Kyoshiro Sasaki, Katsumi Watanabe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Numerical representations influence temporal processing. Previous studies have consistently shown that larger numbers are perceived to last longer than smaller ones. However, whether this effect is modulated by the absolute or relative magnitudes of the numbers has yet to be fully understood. Here, participants observed single- and double-digit Arabic numerals in separate experimental blocks and reproduced stimulus duration of 600 or 1200 ms. Our results replicated previous findings that the duration of larger numbers was reproduced longer than that of smaller numbers within each digit set. Although the effect of numerical magnitude across single- and double-digit numerals was found when the numerals were presented for 600 ms, the difference was negligible when they were presented for 1200 ms, suggesting that relative magnitude is an important factor in the number–time interaction in the suprasecond range. These results suggest that contextual influence on number–time interaction may depend on the actual stimulus duration.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)59-65
Number of pages7
JournalCognitive Processing
Volume17
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

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All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Artificial Intelligence

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The number–time interaction depends on relative magnitude in the suprasecond range. / Yamamoto, Kentaro; Sasaki, Kyoshiro; Watanabe, Katsumi.

In: Cognitive Processing, Vol. 17, No. 1, 01.02.2016, p. 59-65.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yamamoto, Kentaro ; Sasaki, Kyoshiro ; Watanabe, Katsumi. / The number–time interaction depends on relative magnitude in the suprasecond range. In: Cognitive Processing. 2016 ; Vol. 17, No. 1. pp. 59-65.
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