The perception of 3-D rotation from translating sine-wave lines: the reverse of the barber-pole illusion.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    3 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    An ambiguous moving pattern which gives rise to the reverse of the barber-pole illusion is reported. When vertical sine-wave lines translate, vertically and endlessly, on a two-dimensional (2-D) plane, one can perceive rotating three-dimensional (3-D) helixes without the impression of translation. With a single sine-wave line, 3-D rotation was seen for about half the exposure period. With three sine-wave lines shifted in phase by 120 degrees, this illusion easily arose when one fixated a point near the endpoints of the lines, which moved horizontally and sinusoidally along the imaginary upper edge of the screen. When 3-D rotation was seen, the sine-wave lines which were intersecting on a 2-D display were perceptually decomposed into pairs of lines separated in depth. On fixating a point at the center of the figure, vertical translation was mainly seen. Foveal viewing of the horizontal sine movement of the endpoints of the lines produces the impression of 3-D rotation and the impression appears to provide some specific information towards solving the aperture problem and towards reconstructing the whole figure as such.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)209-214
    Number of pages6
    JournalPerception
    Volume22
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1993

    All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

    • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
    • Ophthalmology
    • Sensory Systems
    • Artificial Intelligence

    Fingerprint

    Dive into the research topics of 'The perception of 3-D rotation from translating sine-wave lines: the reverse of the barber-pole illusion.'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this