The potential of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM)-grafted hyaluronan and PNIPAM-grafted gelatin in the control of post-surgical tissue adhesions

Shoji Ohya, Hiromichi Sonoda, Yasuhide Nakayama, Takehisa Matsuda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

79 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-grafted hyaluronan (PNIPAM-HA) and PNIPAM-grafted gelatin (PNIPAM-gelatin), which exhibit sol-to-gel transformation at physiological temperature, were applied as control of tissue adhesions: tissue adhesion prevention material and hemostatic aid, respectively. The rat cecum, which was abraded using surgical gauze, was coated with PNIPAM-HA-containing PBS (concentration: 0.5w/v%). The coated solution was immediately converted to an opaque precipitate at body temperature, which weakly adhered to and covered the injured rat cecum. One week after coating, tissue adhesion between the PNIPAM-HA-treated cecum and adjacent tissues was significantly reduced as compared with that between non-treated tissue and adjacent tissues. On the other hand, the coating of bleeding spots of a canine liver with PNIPAM-gelatin-containing PBS (concentration: 20w/v%) resulted in spontaneous gel formation on the tissues and subsequently suppressed bleeding. Although these thermoresponsive tissue adhesion prevention and hemostatic materials are still prototypes at this time, both thermoresponsive biomacromolecules bioconjugated with PNIPAM, PNIPAM-HA and PNIPAM-gelatin, may serve as a tissue adhesion prevention material and hemostatic aid, respectively.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)655-659
Number of pages5
JournalBiomaterials
Volume26
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 1 2005

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Bioengineering
  • Ceramics and Composites
  • Biophysics
  • Biomaterials
  • Mechanics of Materials

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