The Proportions, Regulations, and Training Plans of Male Midwives Worldwide: A Descriptive Study of 77 Countries

Masana Sannomiya, Emi Sasagawa, Naoko Hikita, Kaori Yonezawa, Megumi Haruna

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: The proportions of male midwives as well as regulations and training plans targeting male midwives were investigated. Methods: Questionnaires were sent to 109 United Nations member countries where midwifery associations had opened their e-mail addresses. Respondents were persons in charge of midwifery education or policy recommended by midwifery associations, researchers, or acquaintances. The questionnaire inquired about the number of midwives and obstetrician-gynecologists by gender in the country, as well as regulations and training plans relevant to male ones. For those countries that either failed to respond or provided insufficient information, supplemental Internet searches were conducted. Results: Data from 77 countries were analyzed (57 countries returned the questionnaires, and data on another 20 were obtained through Internet searches). Of the 19 countries without male midwives, five did not allow men to become midwives. In 37 countries with male midwives whose proportion data were available, the median proportion was 0.63%. Respondents in 13 countries described regulations respecting women who unwanted care by male midwives and in other two explained training plans for male midwives considering their specific characteristics. Conclusion: The proportion of male midwives is small, and regulations and training plans for male midwives varied depending on social content in countries.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)5-18
Number of pages14
JournalInternational Journal of Childbirth
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 1 2019
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Obstetrics and Gynaecology
  • Maternity and Midwifery

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