The relationship between masticatory performance and intakes of foods and nutrients in Japanese male workers: A cross-sectional study

Fuyoko Kawashima Bori, Masayo Fukuhara, Chihiro Masaki, Yuko Ohta, Ikuo Nakamichi, Satoko Sakata, Kenichi Goto, Shota Kataoka, Satoko Kakuta, Masanori Iwasaki, Toshihiro Ansai, Ryuji Hosokawa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Although many studies have been conducted on the relationship between masticatory performance and nutrient ingestion in the elderly, few large-scale studies have been carried out using relatively young individuals. Objectives: The objective of this study was to clarify the association between the masticatory performance evaluated by the gummy-jelly test, not by visual examination, and nutrient ingestion state based on the brief self-administered diet history questionnaire (BDHQ). Methods: This was a cross-sectional survey of 540 male workers. Somatometry, blood pressure measurement, blood test and medical interview were performed as a periodic health check-up. In the dental check-up, an oral examination, gummy-jelly test (glucosensor) and survey of ingested food and nutrients using BDHQ were performed. The participants were classified into two groups with low and normal values of masticatory performance. Participants with a score on the gummy-jelly test below 150 mg/dL or 150 mg/dL or higher were included in the low and normal groups, respectively. Results: Two hundred and forty-eight participants (45.8%) had low masticatory performance, and 292 (53.2%) had normal masticatory performance. The intakes of some minerals and vitamins, such as calcium, vitamin D, vitamin B2, small fish with bones and non-oily fish, were significantly lower in the low masticatory group than in the normal group. In contrast, the intake of sugar for coffee and tea and that of chicken were significantly higher in the low masticatory group than in the normal group. Conclusion: This study suggested that low masticatory performance can affect nutrient intake, which may cause non-communicable diseases.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1142-1149
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of oral rehabilitation
Volume47
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 1 2020

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Dentistry(all)

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