The relationship between school-based career education and subsequent incomes: Empirical evidence from Japan

Tamaki Morita, Kimika Yamamoto, Shunsuke Managi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Students’ career paths in Japan have greatly changed due to macroeconomic factors and the fact that young people are increasingly opting not to participate in the labor force. The need to provide education fostering motivation and qualities required for students’ future social and vocational independence has emerged. The government-promoted career education policies have become established as one of the pillars of youth employment policy. This study explored the effects of career policies in school settings by identifying graduates’ earning capacity (annual income) through an online survey followed by quantitative analysis of the results. We report the evaluation of career policies by respondents, and then measure the effects of these policies on both labor participation and income. Although the specific program we focused on did not show clear effects, career education policies in general, and daily activities in elementary and middle schools affect graduates’ incomes. We also identify other key attributes that influence income.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)70-87
Number of pages18
JournalEconomic Analysis and Policy
Volume58
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1 2018

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Income
Empirical evidence
Japan
Career education
Education policy
Quantitative analysis
Youth employment
Labor
Employment policy
Career paths
Labor force
Participation
Macroeconomic factors
Online survey
Government
Education
Evaluation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Economics and Econometrics

Cite this

The relationship between school-based career education and subsequent incomes : Empirical evidence from Japan. / Morita, Tamaki; Yamamoto, Kimika; Managi, Shunsuke.

In: Economic Analysis and Policy, Vol. 58, 01.06.2018, p. 70-87.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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