The relationship between the age of onset of type 1 diabetes and the subsequent development of a severe eating disorder by female patients

Masato Takii, Yasuko Uchigata, Junji Kishimoto, Chihiro Morita, Tomokazu Hata, Takehiro Nozaki, Keisuke Kawai, Yasuhiko Iwamoto, Nobuyuki Sudo, Chiharu Kubo

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19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To determine the age of onset of type 1 diabetes that is most closely related to the subsequent development of a severe eating disorder such as anorexia nervosa (AN) or bulimia nervosa (BN). Methods: Participants were 53 female type 1 diabetes patients with AN or BN referred to our outpatient clinic from the Diabetes Center of Tokyo Women's Medical University. Forty-nine female type 1 diabetes patients who regularly visited the Diabetes Center and had no eating disorder-related problems constituted the 'direct control' group, whereas 941 female patients who for the first time visited the Diabetes Center constituted the 'historical control' group. The kernel function method was used to generate a density estimation of the onset age of each group and the chi-square test was used to compare the distribution. Results: The control groups had similar density shapes for the onset age of type 1 diabetes, but both differed from the 'eating disorder' group. For onset age 7-18 yr, the density of the 'eating disorder' group was higher than those of the control groups, but for the younger and older onset ages the densities were lower. The 'eating disorder' group developed type 1 diabetes significantly more frequently than the 'historical control' group between 7 and 18 yr of age (χ2 = 9.066, p < 0.011). Conclusion: The development of type 1 diabetes in preadolescence or adolescence seems to place girls at risk for the subsequent development of AN or BN. Careful attention should be paid to these high-risk patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)396-401
Number of pages6
JournalPediatric Diabetes
Volume12
Issue number4 PART 2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1 2011

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Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
Age of Onset
Bulimia Nervosa
Anorexia Nervosa
Control Groups
Tokyo
Chi-Square Distribution
Ambulatory Care Facilities
Feeding and Eating Disorders
Age Groups

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Internal Medicine
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

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The relationship between the age of onset of type 1 diabetes and the subsequent development of a severe eating disorder by female patients. / Takii, Masato; Uchigata, Yasuko; Kishimoto, Junji; Morita, Chihiro; Hata, Tomokazu; Nozaki, Takehiro; Kawai, Keisuke; Iwamoto, Yasuhiko; Sudo, Nobuyuki; Kubo, Chiharu.

In: Pediatric Diabetes, Vol. 12, No. 4 PART 2, 01.06.2011, p. 396-401.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Takii, Masato ; Uchigata, Yasuko ; Kishimoto, Junji ; Morita, Chihiro ; Hata, Tomokazu ; Nozaki, Takehiro ; Kawai, Keisuke ; Iwamoto, Yasuhiko ; Sudo, Nobuyuki ; Kubo, Chiharu. / The relationship between the age of onset of type 1 diabetes and the subsequent development of a severe eating disorder by female patients. In: Pediatric Diabetes. 2011 ; Vol. 12, No. 4 PART 2. pp. 396-401.
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AU - Nozaki, Takehiro

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