The significance of posterior occlusal support of teeth and removable prostheses in oral functions and standing motion

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Abstract

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of posterior occlusal support of natural teeth and artificial teeth on oral functions and standing motion. Patients who had been treated with removable prostheses were enrolled as the subjects. Their systemic conditions (body mass index (BMI) and skeletal muscle mass index (SMI)) were recorded. The subjects were classified into two groups according to a modified Eichner index: B1–3 (with posterior occlusal support) and B4C (without posterior occlusal support). Maximum occlusal force (MOF), masticatory performance (MP), and standing motion (sway and strength) were evaluated for cases with and without removable prostheses. There were no significant differences in BMI and SMI between the B1–3 group and the B4C group. The subjects with removable prostheses demonstrated significantly higher values in MOF, MP, and sway and strength than the subjects without removable prostheses. The comparison of oral functions between the B1–3 group and the B4C group revealed that the positive effect of posterior occlusal support of natural teeth and removable prostheses and the significant positive effects of posterior occlusal support on standing motion were partly observed in these comparisons. Posterior occlusal support of natural teeth and even of removable prostheses may contribute to the enhancement of oral functions and standing motion.

Original languageEnglish
Article number6776
JournalInternational journal of environmental research and public health
Volume18
Issue number13
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 1 2021

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pollution
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

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