The soleus late response elicited by transcranial magnetic stimulation reflects agonist-antagonist postural adjustment in the lower limbs

Rie Suga, Shozo Tobimatsu, Takayuki Taniwaki, Jun ichi Kira, Motohiro Kato

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: We studied the origin and underlying mechanism of the soleus late response (SLR) at a mean latency of 90ms following transcranial magnetic stimulation. Methods: The soleus primary response (SPR) and SLR were recorded from the soleus (SOL) muscle in 27 normal subjects under various conditions using a double-cone coil. We also tested 28 patients demonstrating neurological disorders with postural disturbance. Results: The amplitude of the SPR gradually increased and its latency gradually decreased against the voluntary contraction (0-80%) of the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle. In contrast, the SLR amplitude was the greatest at a 20% TA contraction while the SLR latency was the shortest at a 40% TA contraction. The preactivation of SOL enhanced the SPR response but did not evoke the SLR. The SPR amplitude was significantly augmented while standing, however, the SLR amplitude tended to decrease. The SLR was never obtained following the stimulation of the brainstem, lumbar roots and peroneal nerve. The SLR was abnormal in patients with cerebellar ataxia and Parkinson's disease while the SPR was normal. Conclusions: A lack of any correlation between the SPR and SLR suggests that the SLR does not originate in the corticospinal tract. The SLR may thus be a polysynaptic response related to the postural control of the agonist and antagonist organization between the TA and SOL.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2300-2311
Number of pages12
JournalClinical Neurophysiology
Volume112
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 31 2001

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Social Adjustment
Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation
Lower Extremity
Cerebellar Diseases
Cerebellar Ataxia
Peroneal Nerve
Pyramidal Tracts
Nervous System Diseases
Brain Stem
Reaction Time
Parkinson Disease
Skeletal Muscle
Muscles

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Sensory Systems
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

The soleus late response elicited by transcranial magnetic stimulation reflects agonist-antagonist postural adjustment in the lower limbs. / Suga, Rie; Tobimatsu, Shozo; Taniwaki, Takayuki; Kira, Jun ichi; Kato, Motohiro.

In: Clinical Neurophysiology, Vol. 112, No. 12, 31.12.2001, p. 2300-2311.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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