The utility of muscle sparing axillar skin crease incision for pediatric thoracic surgery

Tomoaki Taguchi, Kouji Nagata, Yoshiaki Kinoshita, Satoshi Ieiri, Tatsuro Tajiri, Risa Teshiba, Genshiro Esumi, Yuji Karashima, Sumio Hoka, Kouji Masumoto

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Abstract

Background: Posterolateral or standard axillar incisions for the pediatric thoracic surgery are occasionally associated with poor motor as well as cosmetic results, including chest deformities and large surgical scars. A muscle sparing axillar skin crease incision (MSASCI) was initially proposed by Bianchi et al. (in J Pediatr Surg 33:1798-1800, 1998) followed by Kalman and Verebely (in Eur J Pediatr Surg 12:226-229, 2002) resulting in satisfactory cosmetics. However, they performed operations through the third or fourth intercostals space (ICS), therefore the target organs were restricted in the upper twothirds of the thoracic cavity. Patients and methods: Thoracic surgeries were performed using MSASCI in 27 patients (1-day to 9-year old). There were ten patients with esophageal atresia, seven with congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation, five with pulmonary sequestration, two with mediastinal neuroblastoma, two with right diaphragmatic hernia, and one with pulmonary hypertension. A thoracotomy was performed through the appropriate ICS (from third to eighth). Results: In all patients, the expected procedures, including pulmonary lower lobectomy, were successfully performed by MSASCI throughout the thoracic cavity. A good operational field was easily obtained in neonates and infants. Most of the patients achieved excellent motor and aesthetic outcomes. Conclusions: MSASCI may become the standard approach for the thoracic surgery for small children.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)239-244
Number of pages6
JournalPediatric surgery international
Volume28
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 1 2012

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All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Surgery

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