Thermal molecular focusing: tunable cross effect of phoresis and light-driven hydrodynamic focusing

Tatsuya Fukuyama, Sho Nakama, Yusuke T. Maeda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The control of solute flux by either microscopic phoresis or hydrodynamic advection is a fundamental way to transport molecules, which are ubiquitously present in nature and technology. We study the transport of large solutes such as DNA driven by a time-dependent thermal field in a polymer solution. Heat propagation of a heat spot moving back and forth gives rise to the molecular focusing of DNA with frequency-tunable control. We develop a model where the viscoelastic expansion of a solution and the viscosity gradient of a smaller solute are coupled, which explains the underlying hydrodynamic focusing. This effect offers novel non-invasive manipulation of soft and biological materials in a frequency-tunable manner.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)5519-5524
Number of pages6
JournalSoft Matter
Volume14
Issue number26
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2018

Fingerprint

solutes
Hydrodynamics
hydrodynamics
deoxyribonucleic acid
heat
DNA
Advection
Polymer solutions
advection
Biological materials
manipulators
Viscosity
viscosity
Fluxes
gradients
Molecules
expansion
propagation
polymers
Hot Temperature

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Condensed Matter Physics

Cite this

Thermal molecular focusing : tunable cross effect of phoresis and light-driven hydrodynamic focusing. / Fukuyama, Tatsuya; Nakama, Sho; Maeda, Yusuke T.

In: Soft Matter, Vol. 14, No. 26, 01.01.2018, p. 5519-5524.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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