Thermodynamic study on phase transition in adsorbed film of fluoroalkanol at the hexane/water interface. 7. Pressure effect on the miscibility in the adsorbed film of alkanol and fluoroalkanol mixture

Takanori Takiue, Norihiro Ikeda, Takayuki Toyomasu, Hiroki Matsubara, Makoto Aratono

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Miscibility of 1-icosanol (C20OH) and 1,1,2,2-tetrahydroheptadecafluorodecanol (FC10OH) in the adsorbed film at the hexane/water interface was studied by measuring the pressure dependence of interfacial tension at various compositions and analyzing the experimental results thermodynamically. The criterion of ideal mixing in the adsorbed film with respect to the volume of adsorption ΔwHv was constructed and used to examine the nonideal mixing of C20OH and FC10OH in the adsorbed film. It is found that the ΔwHv value deviates positively from the ideal mixing line, and therefore the mixing of C20OH and FC10OH molecules causes a larger increase in volume in the adsorbed film than in the bulk solution. Furthermore, the excess volume of adsorption vH,E was positive and its magnitude was comparable to that of the liquid alkane and perfluoroalkane mixture. This result is probably due to the increase in the occupied area of individual components at the interface. To gain a better understanding of the miscibility of C20OH and FC10OH in the adsorbed film, the phase diagram of adsorption (PDA) was constructed at various pressures. We found that these alcohol molecules become less miscible and therefore the activity coefficients of alcohols become larger in the expanded state with increasing pressure. This is in accord with the positive vH,E value. Furthermore the C20OH and FC10OH molecules were practically immiscible in the condensed state at high pressure.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)7096-7101
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Physical Chemistry B
Volume104
Issue number30
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 1 2000

Fingerprint

Pressure effects
Phase Transition
Hexanes
pressure effects
Hexane
Thermodynamics
solubility
Solubility
Phase transitions
Adsorption
Pressure
thermodynamics
Water
water
Alcohols
Molecules
adsorption
alcohols
Alkanes
perfluoroalkane

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surfaces, Coatings and Films
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Materials Chemistry

Cite this

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title = "Thermodynamic study on phase transition in adsorbed film of fluoroalkanol at the hexane/water interface. 7. Pressure effect on the miscibility in the adsorbed film of alkanol and fluoroalkanol mixture",
abstract = "The Miscibility of 1-icosanol (C20OH) and 1,1,2,2-tetrahydroheptadecafluorodecanol (FC10OH) in the adsorbed film at the hexane/water interface was studied by measuring the pressure dependence of interfacial tension at various compositions and analyzing the experimental results thermodynamically. The criterion of ideal mixing in the adsorbed film with respect to the volume of adsorption ΔwHv was constructed and used to examine the nonideal mixing of C20OH and FC10OH in the adsorbed film. It is found that the ΔwHv value deviates positively from the ideal mixing line, and therefore the mixing of C20OH and FC10OH molecules causes a larger increase in volume in the adsorbed film than in the bulk solution. Furthermore, the excess volume of adsorption vH,E was positive and its magnitude was comparable to that of the liquid alkane and perfluoroalkane mixture. This result is probably due to the increase in the occupied area of individual components at the interface. To gain a better understanding of the miscibility of C20OH and FC10OH in the adsorbed film, the phase diagram of adsorption (PDA) was constructed at various pressures. We found that these alcohol molecules become less miscible and therefore the activity coefficients of alcohols become larger in the expanded state with increasing pressure. This is in accord with the positive vH,E value. Furthermore the C20OH and FC10OH molecules were practically immiscible in the condensed state at high pressure.",
author = "Takanori Takiue and Norihiro Ikeda and Takayuki Toyomasu and Hiroki Matsubara and Makoto Aratono",
year = "2000",
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T1 - Thermodynamic study on phase transition in adsorbed film of fluoroalkanol at the hexane/water interface. 7. Pressure effect on the miscibility in the adsorbed film of alkanol and fluoroalkanol mixture

AU - Takiue, Takanori

AU - Ikeda, Norihiro

AU - Toyomasu, Takayuki

AU - Matsubara, Hiroki

AU - Aratono, Makoto

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N2 - The Miscibility of 1-icosanol (C20OH) and 1,1,2,2-tetrahydroheptadecafluorodecanol (FC10OH) in the adsorbed film at the hexane/water interface was studied by measuring the pressure dependence of interfacial tension at various compositions and analyzing the experimental results thermodynamically. The criterion of ideal mixing in the adsorbed film with respect to the volume of adsorption ΔwHv was constructed and used to examine the nonideal mixing of C20OH and FC10OH in the adsorbed film. It is found that the ΔwHv value deviates positively from the ideal mixing line, and therefore the mixing of C20OH and FC10OH molecules causes a larger increase in volume in the adsorbed film than in the bulk solution. Furthermore, the excess volume of adsorption vH,E was positive and its magnitude was comparable to that of the liquid alkane and perfluoroalkane mixture. This result is probably due to the increase in the occupied area of individual components at the interface. To gain a better understanding of the miscibility of C20OH and FC10OH in the adsorbed film, the phase diagram of adsorption (PDA) was constructed at various pressures. We found that these alcohol molecules become less miscible and therefore the activity coefficients of alcohols become larger in the expanded state with increasing pressure. This is in accord with the positive vH,E value. Furthermore the C20OH and FC10OH molecules were practically immiscible in the condensed state at high pressure.

AB - The Miscibility of 1-icosanol (C20OH) and 1,1,2,2-tetrahydroheptadecafluorodecanol (FC10OH) in the adsorbed film at the hexane/water interface was studied by measuring the pressure dependence of interfacial tension at various compositions and analyzing the experimental results thermodynamically. The criterion of ideal mixing in the adsorbed film with respect to the volume of adsorption ΔwHv was constructed and used to examine the nonideal mixing of C20OH and FC10OH in the adsorbed film. It is found that the ΔwHv value deviates positively from the ideal mixing line, and therefore the mixing of C20OH and FC10OH molecules causes a larger increase in volume in the adsorbed film than in the bulk solution. Furthermore, the excess volume of adsorption vH,E was positive and its magnitude was comparable to that of the liquid alkane and perfluoroalkane mixture. This result is probably due to the increase in the occupied area of individual components at the interface. To gain a better understanding of the miscibility of C20OH and FC10OH in the adsorbed film, the phase diagram of adsorption (PDA) was constructed at various pressures. We found that these alcohol molecules become less miscible and therefore the activity coefficients of alcohols become larger in the expanded state with increasing pressure. This is in accord with the positive vH,E value. Furthermore the C20OH and FC10OH molecules were practically immiscible in the condensed state at high pressure.

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