Three-dimensional knee joint kinematics during golf swing and stationary cycling after total knee arthroplasty

Satoshi Hamai, Hiromasa Miura, Hidehiko Higaki, Takeshi Shimoto, Shuichi Matsuda, Ken Okazaki, Yukihide Iwamoto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The expectation of returning to sports activities after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has become more important to patients than ever. To our knowledge, no studies have been published evaluating the three-dimensional knee joint kinematics during sports activity after TKA. Continuous X-ray images of the golf swing and stationary cycling were taken using a large flat panel detector for four and eight post-arthroplasty knees, respectively. The implant flexion and axial rotation angles were determined using a radiographic-based, image-matching technique. Both the golf swing from the set-up position to the top of the backswing, and the stationary cycling from the top position of the crank to the bottom position of the crank, produced progressive axial rotational motions (p = 0.73). However, the golf swing from the top of the backswing to the end of the follow-through produced significantly larger magnitudes of rotational motions in comparison to stationary cycling (p < 0.01). Excessive internal-external rotations generated from the top of the backswing to the end of the follow-through could contribute to accelerated polyethylene wear. However, gradual rotational movements were consistently demonstrated during the stationary cycling. Therefore, stationary cycling is recommended rather than playing golf for patients following a TKA who wish to remain physically active.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1556-1561
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Orthopaedic Research
Volume26
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 2008

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Golf
Knee Replacement Arthroplasties
Knee Joint
Biomechanical Phenomena
Sports
Polyethylene
X-Rays

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Three-dimensional knee joint kinematics during golf swing and stationary cycling after total knee arthroplasty. / Hamai, Satoshi; Miura, Hiromasa; Higaki, Hidehiko; Shimoto, Takeshi; Matsuda, Shuichi; Okazaki, Ken; Iwamoto, Yukihide.

In: Journal of Orthopaedic Research, Vol. 26, No. 12, 01.12.2008, p. 1556-1561.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hamai, Satoshi ; Miura, Hiromasa ; Higaki, Hidehiko ; Shimoto, Takeshi ; Matsuda, Shuichi ; Okazaki, Ken ; Iwamoto, Yukihide. / Three-dimensional knee joint kinematics during golf swing and stationary cycling after total knee arthroplasty. In: Journal of Orthopaedic Research. 2008 ; Vol. 26, No. 12. pp. 1556-1561.
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