Transforming growth factor-β in the brain is activated by exercise and increases mobilization of fat-related energy substrates in rats

Tetsuro Shibakusa, Wataru Mizunoya, Yuki Okabe, Shigenobu Matsumura, Yoko Iwaki, Alato Okuno, Katsumi Shibata, Kazuo Inoue, Tohru Fushiki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We have recently reported that inhibition of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β in the brain reduced fat-related energy substrates concentrations in response to exercise. We investigated the relevance between the mobilization of fat-related energy substrates (nonesterified fatty acid and ketone bodies) during exercise and the effects of TGF-β in the brain. Low-intensity exercise was simulated by contraction of the hindlimbs, induced by electrical stimulation at 2 Hz in anesthetized rats (Sim-Ex). As with actual exercise, it was confirmed that mobilization of carbohydrate-related energy substrates (glucose and lactic acid) occurred immediately after the onset of Sim-Ex, and mobilization of fat-related energy substrates followed thereafter. The timing of mobilization of fat-related substrates corresponded to that of the increase in TGF-β in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in Sim-Ex. The level of TGF-β in CSF significantly increased after 10 min of Sim-Ex and remained elevated until 30 min of Sim-Ex. Intracisternal administration of TGF-β caused rapid mobilization of fat-related energy substrates. Meanwhile, there were no effects on the changes in carbohydrate-related substrates. The levels of catecholamines were slightly elevated after TGF-β administration, and, although not significantly in statistical terms, we consider that at least a part of TGF-β signal was transducted via the sympathetic nervous system because of these increases. These data indicate that TGF-β in the brain is closely related to the mobilization of fat-related energy substrates during low-intensity exercise. We hypothesized that the central nervous system plays a role in the regulation of energy metabolism during low-intensity exercise and this may be mediated by TGF-β.

Original languageEnglish
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Regulatory Integrative and Comparative Physiology
Volume292
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 1 2007
Externally publishedYes

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Transforming Growth Factors
Fats
Brain
Cerebrospinal Fluid
Carbohydrates
Ketone Bodies
Sympathetic Nervous System
Hindlimb
Nonesterified Fatty Acids
Energy Metabolism
Electric Stimulation
Catecholamines
Lactic Acid
Central Nervous System
Glucose

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

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Transforming growth factor-β in the brain is activated by exercise and increases mobilization of fat-related energy substrates in rats. / Shibakusa, Tetsuro; Mizunoya, Wataru; Okabe, Yuki; Matsumura, Shigenobu; Iwaki, Yoko; Okuno, Alato; Shibata, Katsumi; Inoue, Kazuo; Fushiki, Tohru.

In: American Journal of Physiology - Regulatory Integrative and Comparative Physiology, Vol. 292, No. 5, 01.05.2007.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shibakusa, Tetsuro ; Mizunoya, Wataru ; Okabe, Yuki ; Matsumura, Shigenobu ; Iwaki, Yoko ; Okuno, Alato ; Shibata, Katsumi ; Inoue, Kazuo ; Fushiki, Tohru. / Transforming growth factor-β in the brain is activated by exercise and increases mobilization of fat-related energy substrates in rats. In: American Journal of Physiology - Regulatory Integrative and Comparative Physiology. 2007 ; Vol. 292, No. 5.
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