Transforming growth factor-β in the brain regulates fat metabolism during endurance exercise

Toma Ishikawa, Wataru Mizunoya, Tetsuro Shibakusa, Kazuo Inoue, Tohru Fushiki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We have previously reported that the concentration of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) increases in the cerebrospinal fluid of rats during exercise and that there is an increase in whole body fat oxidation following the intracisternal administration of TGF-β. These results led us to postulate that TGF-β in the brain regulates the enhancement of fatty acid oxidation during exercise. To test this hypothesis, we carried out respiratory gas analysis during treadmill running following the inhibition of TGF-β activity in rat brain by intracisternal administration of anti-TGF-β antibody or SB-431542, an inhibitor of the type 1 TGF-β receptor. We found that each reagent partially blocked the increase in the fatty acid oxidation. We also compared the plasma concentrations of energy substrates in the group administered anti-TGF-β antibody and the control group during running. We found that the plasma concentrations of nonesterified fatty acids and ketone bodies in the group administered anti-TGF-β antibody were lower than in the control group at the end of running. In the same way, we carried out respiratory gas analysis during treadmill running after depressing corticotropin-releasing factor activity in the brain using intracisternal administration of astressin, an inhibitor of the corticotropin-releasing factor receptor. However, there were no significant differences in respiratory exchange ratio or oxygen consumption in moderate running (60% maximum oxygen consumption). These results suggest that brain TGF-β has a role in enhancing fatty acid oxidation during endurance exercise and that this regulation is executed at least partly via the type 1 TGF-β receptor signal transduction system.

Original languageEnglish
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Endocrinology and Metabolism
Volume291
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 18 2006
Externally publishedYes

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Transforming Growth Factors
Fats
Brain
Running
Fatty Acids
Growth Factor Receptors
Oxygen Consumption
Antibodies
Gases
Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone Receptors
Ketone Bodies
Control Groups
Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone
Nonesterified Fatty Acids
Cerebrospinal Fluid
Adipose Tissue
Signal Transduction

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Transforming growth factor-β in the brain regulates fat metabolism during endurance exercise. / Ishikawa, Toma; Mizunoya, Wataru; Shibakusa, Tetsuro; Inoue, Kazuo; Fushiki, Tohru.

In: American Journal of Physiology - Endocrinology and Metabolism, Vol. 291, No. 6, 18.12.2006.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ishikawa, Toma ; Mizunoya, Wataru ; Shibakusa, Tetsuro ; Inoue, Kazuo ; Fushiki, Tohru. / Transforming growth factor-β in the brain regulates fat metabolism during endurance exercise. In: American Journal of Physiology - Endocrinology and Metabolism. 2006 ; Vol. 291, No. 6.
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