Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells ameliorates secondary osteoporosis through interleukin-17-impaired functions of recipient bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in MRL/lpr mice

Lan Ma, Reona Aijima, Yoshihiro Hoshino, Haruyoshi Yamaza, Erika Tomoda, Yosuke Tanaka, Soichiro Sonoda, Guangtai Song, Wei Zhao, Kazuaki Nonaka, Songtao Shi, Takayoshi Yamaza

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Abstract

Introduction: Secondary osteoporosis is common in systemic lupus erythematosus and leads to a reduction in quality of life due to fragility fractures, even in patients with improvement of the primary disorder. Systemic transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells could ameliorate bone loss and autoimmune disorders in a MRL/lpr mouse systemic lupus erythematosus model, but the detailed therapeutic mechanism of bone regeneration is not fully understood. In this study, we transplanted human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) and stem cells from exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED) into MRL/lpr mice and explored their therapeutic mechanisms in secondary osteoporotic disorders of the systemic lupus erythematosus model mice. Methods: The effects of systemic human mesenchymal stem cell transplantation on bone loss of MRL/lpr mice were analyzed in vivo and ex vivo. After systemic human mesenchymal stem cell transplantation, recipient BMMSC functions of MRL/lpr mice were assessed for aspects of stemness, osteogenesis and osteoclastogenesis, and a series of co-culture experiments under osteogenic or osteoclastogenic inductions were performed to examine the efficacy of interleukin (IL)-17-impaired recipient BMMSCs in the bone marrow of MRL/lpr mice. Results: Systemic transplantation of human BMMSCs and SHED recovered the reduction in bone density and structure in MRL/lpr mice. To explore the mechanism, we found that impaired recipient BMMSCs mediated the negative bone metabolic turnover by enhanced osteoclastogenesis and suppressed osteoblastogenesis in secondary osteoporosis of MRL/lpr mice. Moreover, IL-17-dependent hyperimmune conditions in the recipient bone marrow of MRL/lpr mice damaged recipient BMMSCs to suppress osteoblast capacity and accelerate osteoclast induction. To overcome the abnormal bone metabolism, systemic transplantation of human BMMSCs and SHED into MRL/lpr mice improved the functionally impaired recipient BMMSCs through IL-17 suppression in the recipient bone marrow and then maintained a regular positive bone metabolism via the balance of osteoblasts and osteoclasts. Conclusions: These findings indicate that IL-17 and recipient BMMSCs might be a therapeutic target for secondary osteoporosis in systemic lupus erythematosus.

Original languageEnglish
Article number104
JournalStem Cell Research and Therapy
Volume6
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 27 2015

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Inbred MRL lpr Mouse
Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation
Interleukin-17
Stem cells
Mesenchymal Stromal Cells
Osteoporosis
Bone
Bone Marrow
Systemic Lupus Erythematosus
Osteogenesis
Bone and Bones
Osteoclasts
Osteoblasts
Bone Marrow Transplantation
Bone Regeneration
Deciduous Tooth
Bone Remodeling
Coculture Techniques
Metabolism
Bone Density

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology (miscellaneous)
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells ameliorates secondary osteoporosis through interleukin-17-impaired functions of recipient bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in MRL/lpr mice. / Ma, Lan; Aijima, Reona; Hoshino, Yoshihiro; Yamaza, Haruyoshi; Tomoda, Erika; Tanaka, Yosuke; Sonoda, Soichiro; Song, Guangtai; Zhao, Wei; Nonaka, Kazuaki; Shi, Songtao; Yamaza, Takayoshi.

In: Stem Cell Research and Therapy, Vol. 6, No. 1, 104, 27.05.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Introduction: Secondary osteoporosis is common in systemic lupus erythematosus and leads to a reduction in quality of life due to fragility fractures, even in patients with improvement of the primary disorder. Systemic transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells could ameliorate bone loss and autoimmune disorders in a MRL/lpr mouse systemic lupus erythematosus model, but the detailed therapeutic mechanism of bone regeneration is not fully understood. In this study, we transplanted human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) and stem cells from exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED) into MRL/lpr mice and explored their therapeutic mechanisms in secondary osteoporotic disorders of the systemic lupus erythematosus model mice. Methods: The effects of systemic human mesenchymal stem cell transplantation on bone loss of MRL/lpr mice were analyzed in vivo and ex vivo. After systemic human mesenchymal stem cell transplantation, recipient BMMSC functions of MRL/lpr mice were assessed for aspects of stemness, osteogenesis and osteoclastogenesis, and a series of co-culture experiments under osteogenic or osteoclastogenic inductions were performed to examine the efficacy of interleukin (IL)-17-impaired recipient BMMSCs in the bone marrow of MRL/lpr mice. Results: Systemic transplantation of human BMMSCs and SHED recovered the reduction in bone density and structure in MRL/lpr mice. To explore the mechanism, we found that impaired recipient BMMSCs mediated the negative bone metabolic turnover by enhanced osteoclastogenesis and suppressed osteoblastogenesis in secondary osteoporosis of MRL/lpr mice. Moreover, IL-17-dependent hyperimmune conditions in the recipient bone marrow of MRL/lpr mice damaged recipient BMMSCs to suppress osteoblast capacity and accelerate osteoclast induction. To overcome the abnormal bone metabolism, systemic transplantation of human BMMSCs and SHED into MRL/lpr mice improved the functionally impaired recipient BMMSCs through IL-17 suppression in the recipient bone marrow and then maintained a regular positive bone metabolism via the balance of osteoblasts and osteoclasts. Conclusions: These findings indicate that IL-17 and recipient BMMSCs might be a therapeutic target for secondary osteoporosis in systemic lupus erythematosus.",
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T1 - Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells ameliorates secondary osteoporosis through interleukin-17-impaired functions of recipient bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in MRL/lpr mice

AU - Ma, Lan

AU - Aijima, Reona

AU - Hoshino, Yoshihiro

AU - Yamaza, Haruyoshi

AU - Tomoda, Erika

AU - Tanaka, Yosuke

AU - Sonoda, Soichiro

AU - Song, Guangtai

AU - Zhao, Wei

AU - Nonaka, Kazuaki

AU - Shi, Songtao

AU - Yamaza, Takayoshi

PY - 2015/5/27

Y1 - 2015/5/27

N2 - Introduction: Secondary osteoporosis is common in systemic lupus erythematosus and leads to a reduction in quality of life due to fragility fractures, even in patients with improvement of the primary disorder. Systemic transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells could ameliorate bone loss and autoimmune disorders in a MRL/lpr mouse systemic lupus erythematosus model, but the detailed therapeutic mechanism of bone regeneration is not fully understood. In this study, we transplanted human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) and stem cells from exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED) into MRL/lpr mice and explored their therapeutic mechanisms in secondary osteoporotic disorders of the systemic lupus erythematosus model mice. Methods: The effects of systemic human mesenchymal stem cell transplantation on bone loss of MRL/lpr mice were analyzed in vivo and ex vivo. After systemic human mesenchymal stem cell transplantation, recipient BMMSC functions of MRL/lpr mice were assessed for aspects of stemness, osteogenesis and osteoclastogenesis, and a series of co-culture experiments under osteogenic or osteoclastogenic inductions were performed to examine the efficacy of interleukin (IL)-17-impaired recipient BMMSCs in the bone marrow of MRL/lpr mice. Results: Systemic transplantation of human BMMSCs and SHED recovered the reduction in bone density and structure in MRL/lpr mice. To explore the mechanism, we found that impaired recipient BMMSCs mediated the negative bone metabolic turnover by enhanced osteoclastogenesis and suppressed osteoblastogenesis in secondary osteoporosis of MRL/lpr mice. Moreover, IL-17-dependent hyperimmune conditions in the recipient bone marrow of MRL/lpr mice damaged recipient BMMSCs to suppress osteoblast capacity and accelerate osteoclast induction. To overcome the abnormal bone metabolism, systemic transplantation of human BMMSCs and SHED into MRL/lpr mice improved the functionally impaired recipient BMMSCs through IL-17 suppression in the recipient bone marrow and then maintained a regular positive bone metabolism via the balance of osteoblasts and osteoclasts. Conclusions: These findings indicate that IL-17 and recipient BMMSCs might be a therapeutic target for secondary osteoporosis in systemic lupus erythematosus.

AB - Introduction: Secondary osteoporosis is common in systemic lupus erythematosus and leads to a reduction in quality of life due to fragility fractures, even in patients with improvement of the primary disorder. Systemic transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells could ameliorate bone loss and autoimmune disorders in a MRL/lpr mouse systemic lupus erythematosus model, but the detailed therapeutic mechanism of bone regeneration is not fully understood. In this study, we transplanted human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) and stem cells from exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED) into MRL/lpr mice and explored their therapeutic mechanisms in secondary osteoporotic disorders of the systemic lupus erythematosus model mice. Methods: The effects of systemic human mesenchymal stem cell transplantation on bone loss of MRL/lpr mice were analyzed in vivo and ex vivo. After systemic human mesenchymal stem cell transplantation, recipient BMMSC functions of MRL/lpr mice were assessed for aspects of stemness, osteogenesis and osteoclastogenesis, and a series of co-culture experiments under osteogenic or osteoclastogenic inductions were performed to examine the efficacy of interleukin (IL)-17-impaired recipient BMMSCs in the bone marrow of MRL/lpr mice. Results: Systemic transplantation of human BMMSCs and SHED recovered the reduction in bone density and structure in MRL/lpr mice. To explore the mechanism, we found that impaired recipient BMMSCs mediated the negative bone metabolic turnover by enhanced osteoclastogenesis and suppressed osteoblastogenesis in secondary osteoporosis of MRL/lpr mice. Moreover, IL-17-dependent hyperimmune conditions in the recipient bone marrow of MRL/lpr mice damaged recipient BMMSCs to suppress osteoblast capacity and accelerate osteoclast induction. To overcome the abnormal bone metabolism, systemic transplantation of human BMMSCs and SHED into MRL/lpr mice improved the functionally impaired recipient BMMSCs through IL-17 suppression in the recipient bone marrow and then maintained a regular positive bone metabolism via the balance of osteoblasts and osteoclasts. Conclusions: These findings indicate that IL-17 and recipient BMMSCs might be a therapeutic target for secondary osteoporosis in systemic lupus erythematosus.

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