Traumatic neuroma of the anterior cervical nerve root with no subjective episode of trauma. Report of four cases

Hiroshi Nomura, Katsumi Harimaya, Hisaya Orii, Keiichiro Shiba, Takayoshi Ueta, Toru Iwaki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The authors report four cases of traumatic neuroma in the cervical nerve root in patients with no history of trauma. In one case the patient presented with intractable pain in the left upper extremity and motor paresis of the left shoulder, and in another case the patient suffered neuropathic pain in the left forearm. In both cases, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging revealed an intradural extramedullary mass lesion in the ipsilateral cervical nerve root; these MR imaging signals were similar to the intensity of the spinal cord. Intraoperatively, fusiform enlargement of the anterior cervical nerve root was detected in the subarachnoid space. Histological examination showed a meandering change of axons accompanied by mild axonal swelling and a thin myelin sheath, which are consistent with the typical pathological features of traumatic neuroma. Postoperatively, pain resolved in both cases. The authors also investigated two traumatic neuromas of the anterior cervical nerve root in autopsy cases in which there was no history of trauma and no significant neurological signs suggestive of traumatic neuroma. The authors conclude that traumatic neuroma of the anterior cervical nerve root may develop following an unnoticed minor brachial plexus injury at birth or a forgotten traction injury of the upper extremity in childhood, and the lesion may be accompanied by various case-specific clinical features.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)393-396
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Neurosurgery
Volume97
Issue number3 SUPPL.
Publication statusPublished - Oct 1 2002

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)

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