Tributyltin and perfluorooctane sulfonate play a synergistic role in promoting excess fat accumulation in Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) via in ovo exposure

Xuchun Qiu, Naoto Iwasaki, Kun Chen, Yohei Shimasaki, Yuji Oshima

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3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The ubiquitous environmental obesogens tributyltin (TBT) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) may accumulate in parent and be transferred to their offspring, resulting in trans-generational adverse effects. In this study, we investigated the combined toxic and obesogenic effects of TBT and PFOS on the early life stages of Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes). In ovo nanoinjection was used to simulate the maternal transfer process. Doses were controlled at 0, 0.05, 0.5, and 2.5 ng/egg (TBT) and at 0, 0.05, 0.5, and 5.0 ng/egg (PFOS), with a full factorial design for mixture formulations. Relatively high doses of agents in mixtures were needed to induce significant mortality (TBT ≥ 0.5 ng/egg) or delayed hatching (PFOS = 5.0 ng/egg) of embryos. The interaction between TBT and PFOS in mixtures had significant effects on the observed hatching delay, but not on acute mortality. Compared with controls, separate exposure to TBT (or PFOS) notably elevated adipose areas at the doses of 0.05 and 0.5 ng/egg, but not at the highest doses. Combined exposure significantly promoted the fat accumulation in newly hatched larvae, even when the doses of TBT and PFOS were both at the levels that did not show obesogenic effect. The interactive effect of TBT and PFOS could aggravate the total obesogenic effect of their mixtures, indicating a synergistic interaction. These results highlight the importance of paying close attention to interaction effects when addressing the impacts of mixtures of environmental obesogens.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)687-695
Number of pages9
JournalChemosphere
Volume220
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 1 2019

Fingerprint

Oryzias
tributyltin
sulfonate
Oils and fats
fat
Fats
Ovum
egg
Exposure controls
hatching
mortality
Mortality
exposure
perfluorooctane sulfonic acid
Poisons
effect
Larva
embryo
Embryonic Structures
Mothers

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Environmental Engineering
  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Chemistry(all)
  • Pollution
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Cite this

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title = "Tributyltin and perfluorooctane sulfonate play a synergistic role in promoting excess fat accumulation in Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) via in ovo exposure",
abstract = "The ubiquitous environmental obesogens tributyltin (TBT) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) may accumulate in parent and be transferred to their offspring, resulting in trans-generational adverse effects. In this study, we investigated the combined toxic and obesogenic effects of TBT and PFOS on the early life stages of Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes). In ovo nanoinjection was used to simulate the maternal transfer process. Doses were controlled at 0, 0.05, 0.5, and 2.5 ng/egg (TBT) and at 0, 0.05, 0.5, and 5.0 ng/egg (PFOS), with a full factorial design for mixture formulations. Relatively high doses of agents in mixtures were needed to induce significant mortality (TBT ≥ 0.5 ng/egg) or delayed hatching (PFOS = 5.0 ng/egg) of embryos. The interaction between TBT and PFOS in mixtures had significant effects on the observed hatching delay, but not on acute mortality. Compared with controls, separate exposure to TBT (or PFOS) notably elevated adipose areas at the doses of 0.05 and 0.5 ng/egg, but not at the highest doses. Combined exposure significantly promoted the fat accumulation in newly hatched larvae, even when the doses of TBT and PFOS were both at the levels that did not show obesogenic effect. The interactive effect of TBT and PFOS could aggravate the total obesogenic effect of their mixtures, indicating a synergistic interaction. These results highlight the importance of paying close attention to interaction effects when addressing the impacts of mixtures of environmental obesogens.",
author = "Xuchun Qiu and Naoto Iwasaki and Kun Chen and Yohei Shimasaki and Yuji Oshima",
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T1 - Tributyltin and perfluorooctane sulfonate play a synergistic role in promoting excess fat accumulation in Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) via in ovo exposure

AU - Qiu, Xuchun

AU - Iwasaki, Naoto

AU - Chen, Kun

AU - Shimasaki, Yohei

AU - Oshima, Yuji

PY - 2019/4/1

Y1 - 2019/4/1

N2 - The ubiquitous environmental obesogens tributyltin (TBT) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) may accumulate in parent and be transferred to their offspring, resulting in trans-generational adverse effects. In this study, we investigated the combined toxic and obesogenic effects of TBT and PFOS on the early life stages of Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes). In ovo nanoinjection was used to simulate the maternal transfer process. Doses were controlled at 0, 0.05, 0.5, and 2.5 ng/egg (TBT) and at 0, 0.05, 0.5, and 5.0 ng/egg (PFOS), with a full factorial design for mixture formulations. Relatively high doses of agents in mixtures were needed to induce significant mortality (TBT ≥ 0.5 ng/egg) or delayed hatching (PFOS = 5.0 ng/egg) of embryos. The interaction between TBT and PFOS in mixtures had significant effects on the observed hatching delay, but not on acute mortality. Compared with controls, separate exposure to TBT (or PFOS) notably elevated adipose areas at the doses of 0.05 and 0.5 ng/egg, but not at the highest doses. Combined exposure significantly promoted the fat accumulation in newly hatched larvae, even when the doses of TBT and PFOS were both at the levels that did not show obesogenic effect. The interactive effect of TBT and PFOS could aggravate the total obesogenic effect of their mixtures, indicating a synergistic interaction. These results highlight the importance of paying close attention to interaction effects when addressing the impacts of mixtures of environmental obesogens.

AB - The ubiquitous environmental obesogens tributyltin (TBT) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) may accumulate in parent and be transferred to their offspring, resulting in trans-generational adverse effects. In this study, we investigated the combined toxic and obesogenic effects of TBT and PFOS on the early life stages of Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes). In ovo nanoinjection was used to simulate the maternal transfer process. Doses were controlled at 0, 0.05, 0.5, and 2.5 ng/egg (TBT) and at 0, 0.05, 0.5, and 5.0 ng/egg (PFOS), with a full factorial design for mixture formulations. Relatively high doses of agents in mixtures were needed to induce significant mortality (TBT ≥ 0.5 ng/egg) or delayed hatching (PFOS = 5.0 ng/egg) of embryos. The interaction between TBT and PFOS in mixtures had significant effects on the observed hatching delay, but not on acute mortality. Compared with controls, separate exposure to TBT (or PFOS) notably elevated adipose areas at the doses of 0.05 and 0.5 ng/egg, but not at the highest doses. Combined exposure significantly promoted the fat accumulation in newly hatched larvae, even when the doses of TBT and PFOS were both at the levels that did not show obesogenic effect. The interactive effect of TBT and PFOS could aggravate the total obesogenic effect of their mixtures, indicating a synergistic interaction. These results highlight the importance of paying close attention to interaction effects when addressing the impacts of mixtures of environmental obesogens.

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