Tropospheric aerosol impacts on trace gas budgets through photolysis

Huisheng Bian, Michael J. Prather, Toshihiko Takemura

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    37 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Aerosols affect the global budgets Of O3, OH, and CH4 in part through their alteration of photolysis rates and in part through their direct chemical interactions with gases (i.e., "heterogeneous chemistry"). The first effect is evaluated here with a global tropospheric chemistry transport model using recently developed global climatologies of tropospheric aerosols: a satellite-derived aerosol climatology over the oceans by advanced very high resolution radiometer and a model-generated climatology for land plus oceans by the Center for Climate System Research. Globally averaged, the impact of aerosols on photolysis alone is to increase tropospheric O3 by 0.63 Dobson units and increase tropospheric CH4 by 130 ppb (via tropospheric OH decreases of 8%). These greenhouse gas increases lead to an aerosol indirect effect (counting both natural and anthropogenic aerosols) of +0.08 W/m2 . Although the CH4 increases are, of course, global, the changes in tropospheric OH and O3 are mainly regional, with the largest impacts in northwest Affica for January and in India and southern Affica for July. The influence of aerosols is greater in July than in January and greater in the Northern Hemisphere than in the Southern Hemisphere, as expected given the pollution sources in the Northern Hemisphere. The predominant impact is due to the aerosols over land; aerosols over the ocean contribute less than a third to globally integrated changes.

    Original languageEnglish
    JournalJournal of Geophysical Research D: Atmospheres
    Volume108
    Issue number8
    Publication statusPublished - Apr 27 2003

    Fingerprint

    photolysis
    Photolysis
    aerosols
    trace gas
    Aerosols
    budgets
    Gases
    gases
    aerosol
    methane
    Climatology
    oceans
    climatology
    Northern Hemisphere
    chemistry
    ocean
    global budgets
    budget
    chemical interactions
    Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer

    All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

    • Geophysics
    • Forestry
    • Oceanography
    • Aquatic Science
    • Ecology
    • Water Science and Technology
    • Soil Science
    • Geochemistry and Petrology
    • Earth-Surface Processes
    • Atmospheric Science
    • Earth and Planetary Sciences (miscellaneous)
    • Space and Planetary Science
    • Palaeontology

    Cite this

    Tropospheric aerosol impacts on trace gas budgets through photolysis. / Bian, Huisheng; Prather, Michael J.; Takemura, Toshihiko.

    In: Journal of Geophysical Research D: Atmospheres, Vol. 108, No. 8, 27.04.2003.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    @article{f411ac6baaec414ba9b6d52acddbbb21,
    title = "Tropospheric aerosol impacts on trace gas budgets through photolysis",
    abstract = "Aerosols affect the global budgets Of O3, OH, and CH4 in part through their alteration of photolysis rates and in part through their direct chemical interactions with gases (i.e., {"}heterogeneous chemistry{"}). The first effect is evaluated here with a global tropospheric chemistry transport model using recently developed global climatologies of tropospheric aerosols: a satellite-derived aerosol climatology over the oceans by advanced very high resolution radiometer and a model-generated climatology for land plus oceans by the Center for Climate System Research. Globally averaged, the impact of aerosols on photolysis alone is to increase tropospheric O3 by 0.63 Dobson units and increase tropospheric CH4 by 130 ppb (via tropospheric OH decreases of 8{\%}). These greenhouse gas increases lead to an aerosol indirect effect (counting both natural and anthropogenic aerosols) of +0.08 W/m2 . Although the CH4 increases are, of course, global, the changes in tropospheric OH and O3 are mainly regional, with the largest impacts in northwest Affica for January and in India and southern Affica for July. The influence of aerosols is greater in July than in January and greater in the Northern Hemisphere than in the Southern Hemisphere, as expected given the pollution sources in the Northern Hemisphere. The predominant impact is due to the aerosols over land; aerosols over the ocean contribute less than a third to globally integrated changes.",
    author = "Huisheng Bian and Prather, {Michael J.} and Toshihiko Takemura",
    year = "2003",
    month = "4",
    day = "27",
    language = "English",
    volume = "108",
    journal = "Journal of Geophysical Research",
    issn = "0148-0227",
    publisher = "American Geophysical Union",
    number = "8",

    }

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Tropospheric aerosol impacts on trace gas budgets through photolysis

    AU - Bian, Huisheng

    AU - Prather, Michael J.

    AU - Takemura, Toshihiko

    PY - 2003/4/27

    Y1 - 2003/4/27

    N2 - Aerosols affect the global budgets Of O3, OH, and CH4 in part through their alteration of photolysis rates and in part through their direct chemical interactions with gases (i.e., "heterogeneous chemistry"). The first effect is evaluated here with a global tropospheric chemistry transport model using recently developed global climatologies of tropospheric aerosols: a satellite-derived aerosol climatology over the oceans by advanced very high resolution radiometer and a model-generated climatology for land plus oceans by the Center for Climate System Research. Globally averaged, the impact of aerosols on photolysis alone is to increase tropospheric O3 by 0.63 Dobson units and increase tropospheric CH4 by 130 ppb (via tropospheric OH decreases of 8%). These greenhouse gas increases lead to an aerosol indirect effect (counting both natural and anthropogenic aerosols) of +0.08 W/m2 . Although the CH4 increases are, of course, global, the changes in tropospheric OH and O3 are mainly regional, with the largest impacts in northwest Affica for January and in India and southern Affica for July. The influence of aerosols is greater in July than in January and greater in the Northern Hemisphere than in the Southern Hemisphere, as expected given the pollution sources in the Northern Hemisphere. The predominant impact is due to the aerosols over land; aerosols over the ocean contribute less than a third to globally integrated changes.

    AB - Aerosols affect the global budgets Of O3, OH, and CH4 in part through their alteration of photolysis rates and in part through their direct chemical interactions with gases (i.e., "heterogeneous chemistry"). The first effect is evaluated here with a global tropospheric chemistry transport model using recently developed global climatologies of tropospheric aerosols: a satellite-derived aerosol climatology over the oceans by advanced very high resolution radiometer and a model-generated climatology for land plus oceans by the Center for Climate System Research. Globally averaged, the impact of aerosols on photolysis alone is to increase tropospheric O3 by 0.63 Dobson units and increase tropospheric CH4 by 130 ppb (via tropospheric OH decreases of 8%). These greenhouse gas increases lead to an aerosol indirect effect (counting both natural and anthropogenic aerosols) of +0.08 W/m2 . Although the CH4 increases are, of course, global, the changes in tropospheric OH and O3 are mainly regional, with the largest impacts in northwest Affica for January and in India and southern Affica for July. The influence of aerosols is greater in July than in January and greater in the Northern Hemisphere than in the Southern Hemisphere, as expected given the pollution sources in the Northern Hemisphere. The predominant impact is due to the aerosols over land; aerosols over the ocean contribute less than a third to globally integrated changes.

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=1342279003&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=1342279003&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    M3 - Article

    AN - SCOPUS:1342279003

    VL - 108

    JO - Journal of Geophysical Research

    JF - Journal of Geophysical Research

    SN - 0148-0227

    IS - 8

    ER -